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The Implications for Health, Depression, and Life Satisfaction from a Permanent Increase in Income for the Disadvantaged Elderly: Evidence from Taiwan

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  • Fu-Min Tseng
  • Dennis James Petrie

Abstract

This paper uses an exogenous increase in income for a specific subgroup to explore the extent to which higher income leads to higher levels of health and well-being. In 1995, the Taiwanese government implemented the Senior Farmer Welfare Benefit Interim Regulation (SFWBIR) that was a pure cash injection to senior farmers. A difference-in-differences (DiD) approach is used on survey data from the Taiwanese Health and Living Status of Elderly in 1989 and 1996 to evaluate the short-term effect of the SFWBIR on self-assessed health, depression, and life satisfaction (LS). Senior manufacturing workers are employed as a comparison group for senior farmers in the natural experiment. This paper provides evidence that the increase in income caused by this pension reform significantly improved the mental health of senior farmers by reducing 1.697 points of the depression scale in DiD and 2.178 points in the robust estimation; however, it had no significant short-term impact on self-assessed health or LS.

Suggested Citation

  • Fu-Min Tseng & Dennis James Petrie, 2014. "The Implications for Health, Depression, and Life Satisfaction from a Permanent Increase in Income for the Disadvantaged Elderly: Evidence from Taiwan," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 72(3), pages 311-336, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:rsocec:v:72:y:2014:i:3:p:311-336
    DOI: 10.1080/00346764.2014.927725
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    Cited by:

    1. Pak, Tae-Young, 2020. "What Are the Effects of Expanding Social Pension on Health? Evidence from the Basic Pension in South Korea," MPRA Paper 103794, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 29 Sep 2020.

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