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Estimating the Impact of Small-Scale Farmer Collective Action on Food Safety: The Case of Vegetables in Vietnam

Author

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  • Diego Naziri
  • Magali Aubert
  • Jean-Marie Codron
  • Nguyen Thi Tan Loc
  • Paule Moustier

Abstract

This paper is an original empirical attempt to explain the outcome of collective action in the domain of food safety. We examine conditions and institutions that influence pesticide residue levels in vegetables using econometric analysis on data gathered from 60 farmer organisations in Vietnam. Findings suggest that collective action affects safety in that it provides members with technical assistance and monitoring for pest management at the farming level. They confirm the U-shape hypothesis of the effect of group size on safety performance which derives from the trade-off that exists between economies of scale and free-riding. The contribution of public authorities and ecological conditions to food safety remains controversial, while market forces do not yet seem able to drive the production of safer vegetables.

Suggested Citation

  • Diego Naziri & Magali Aubert & Jean-Marie Codron & Nguyen Thi Tan Loc & Paule Moustier, 2014. "Estimating the Impact of Small-Scale Farmer Collective Action on Food Safety: The Case of Vegetables in Vietnam," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(5), pages 715-730, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:50:y:2014:i:5:p:715-730
    DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2013.874555
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chemnitz, Christine & Grethe, Harald & Kleinwechter, Ulrich, 2007. "Quality Standards for Food Products - A Particular Burden for Small Producers in Developing Countries?," 106th Seminar, October 25-27, 2007, Montpellier, France 7926, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. McCarthy, Nancy & Essam, Timothy, 2009. "Impact of water user associations on agricultural productivity in Chile:," IFPRI discussion papers 892, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Wolz, Axel & Kopsidis, Michael & Reinsberg, Klaus, 2009. "The Transformation of Agricultural Production Cooperatives in East Germany and Their Future," Journal of Rural Cooperation, Hebrew University, Center for Agricultural Economic Research, vol. 37(1), pages 1-15.
    4. Caswell, Margriet & Fuglie, Keith O. & Ingram, Cassandra & Jans, Sharon & Kascak, Catherine, 2001. "Adoption of Agricultural Production Practices: Lessons Learned from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Area Studies Project," Agricultural Economics Reports 33985, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander E. Saak, 2012. "Collective Reputation, Social Norms, and Participation," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 94(3), pages 763-785.
    2. Tran, Duc & Goto, Daisaku, 2019. "Impacts of sustainability certification on farm income: Evidence from small-scale specialty green tea farmers in Vietnam," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 70-82.
    3. Ji, Chen & Jin, Songqing & Wang, Haitao & Ye, Chunhui, 2019. "Estimating effects of cooperative membership on farmers’ safe production behaviors: Evidence from pig sector in China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 231-245.

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