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Evaluating the impact of Egyptian Social Fund for Development programmes


  • Hala Abou-Ali
  • Hesham El-Azony
  • Heba El-Laithy
  • Jonathan Haughton
  • Shahid Khandker


Since its inception in 1991, the Egyptian Social Fund for Development (SFD) has spent about US$600 million supporting microcredit, and financing community development and infrastructure. Applying propensity-score matching using household survey data for 2004/05, this paper finds that SFD programmes have had clear and measurable effects, in the expected direction, for the six programmes considered here: education, health, potable water, sanitation, roads, and microcredit. SFD road projects generate benefits that, by some estimates, exceed their costs, as do health and potable water interventions; this is less evident for programmes in education and sanitation. SFD support for microcredit is strongly pro-poor; the other programmes analysed here appear to have a more modest pro-poor orientation.

Suggested Citation

  • Hala Abou-Ali & Hesham El-Azony & Heba El-Laithy & Jonathan Haughton & Shahid Khandker, 2010. "Evaluating the impact of Egyptian Social Fund for Development programmes," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(4), pages 521-555.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevef:v:2:y:2010:i:4:p:521-555 DOI: 10.1080/19439342.2010.529926

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Laura B. Rawlings & Lynne Sherburne-Benz & Julie van Domelen, 2004. "Evaluating Social Funds : A Cross-Country Analysis of Community Investments," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15057.
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    Cited by:

    1. Erhardt, Eva Christine, 2017. "Microfinance beyond self-employment: Evidence for firms in Bulgaria," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 75-95.
    2. Mathilde Maîtrot & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, 2017. "Poverty and wellbeing impacts of microfinance: What do we know?," WIDER Working Paper Series 190, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Maren Duvendack & Richard Palmer-Jones, 2012. "High Noon for Microfinance Impact Evaluations: Re-investigating the Evidence from Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(12), pages 1864-1880, December.
    4. Caroline Krafft, 2016. "Why is Fertility on the Rise in Egypt? The Role of Women’s Employment Opportunities," Working Papers 1050, Economic Research Forum, revised 09 Jan 2016.
    5. Karshenas, Massoud & Moghadam, Valentine M. & Alami, Randa, 2014. "Social Policy after the Arab Spring: States and Social Rights in the MENA Region," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 726-739.
    6. Alberto Minujin, 2011. "Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities, A Study of Seven Countries," Working papers 1109, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
    7. Lobna M. Abdellatif & Mohamed Ramadan & Sarah A. Elbakry, 2017. "How Gender Biased Are Female-Headed Household Transfers in Egypt?," Working Papers 1126, Economic Research Forum, revised 08 Oct 2017.
    8. World Bank, 2012. "Reclaiming their Voice : New Perspectives From Young Women and Men in Upper Egypt," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11908, The World Bank.


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