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Effects of trade openness on the steady-state growth rates of selected Asian countries with an extended exogenous growth model

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  • B. Bhaskara Rao
  • Rup Singh

Abstract

The Solow (1956) growth model is extended with an endogenous growth framework to estimate the effects of trade openness on the Steady State Growth Rate (SSGR). Estimates of the augmented production functions are used to compute the SSGRs for Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, India and Thailand. Good policies that increase the growth effects of openness is also tested with an interactive term. Our results show that Singapore has the highest SSGR of 2.75%, followed by Hong Kong and Thailand with 2.5%. India and Malaysia have lower SSGRs of 1.7% and 0.5%, respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • B. Bhaskara Rao & Rup Singh, 2010. "Effects of trade openness on the steady-state growth rates of selected Asian countries with an extended exogenous growth model," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(29), pages 3693-3702.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:42:y:2010:i:29:p:3693-3702
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840802534468
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    Cited by:

    1. B. Bhaskara Rao & Artur Tamazian & Krishna Chaitanya Vadlamannati, 2011. "Growth effects of a comprehensive measure of globalization with country-specific time series data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(5), pages 551-568.
    2. Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh & Stauvermann, Peter Josef & Loganathan, Nanthakumar & Kumar, Radika Devi, 2015. "Exploring the role of energy, trade and financial development in explaining economic growth in South Africa: A revisit," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 1300-1311.
    3. Rao, B. Bhaskara & Singh, Rup, 2009. "Panel data estimates of the growth and level effects of human capital in the selected Asian countries," MPRA Paper 19082, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Zohreh Shirani Fakhr & Azita Sheikhbahaie, 2008. "Openness, Growth, and Development: Evidence from a Panel of East Asian Countries," Iranian Economic Review, Economics faculty of Tehran university, vol. 13(2), pages 157-174, fall.
    5. Rup Singh, 2015. "Forces of economic growth in China, India, and other Asian countries," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 29(1), pages 62-81, May.
    6. repec:kap:ecopln:v:51:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10644-016-9198-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Ronald Kumar & Peter Stauvermann, 2014. "Exploring the nexus between remittances and economic growth: a study of Bangladesh," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 61(4), pages 399-415, December.
    8. Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh & Stauvermann, Peter Josef & Patel, Arvind & Kumar, Radika Devi, 2014. "Exploring the effects of energy consumption on output per worker: A study of Albania, Bulgaria, Hungary and Romania," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 575-585.
    9. Ronald Ravinesh Kumar & Peter Josef Stauvermann & Arvind Patel, 2016. "Exploring the link between research and economic growth: an empirical study of China and USA," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 1073-1091, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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