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Do central banks act asymmetrically? Empirical evidence from the ECB and the Bank of England

  • Carlo Altavilla
  • Luigi Landolfo

The paper attempts to exploit whether monetary authorities have a different behaviour during recession and expansion. To this end, a multivariate extension of Hamilton Markov-switching model is adopted. First, regime dependent Taylor-type rules are estimated for the Euro Area and the United Kingdom in order to capture the systematic behaviour of central banks. Then, impulse response functions that account for the different phases of the business cycle are analysed. In addition, a comparative analysis concerning the estimated rules as well as the different reaction of real economy to monetary shocks is implemented. The study strongly suggests that central banks cannot neglect the regime where the monetary action takes place. It follows that the phase of business cycle is an important matter in monetary policy decision process.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 37 (2005)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 507-519

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:37:y:2005:i:5:p:507-519
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  1. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark, 1995. "Inside the Black Box: The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission," Working Papers 95-15, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
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  8. Bernanke, Ben S & Blinder, Alan S, 1992. "The Federal Funds Rate and the Channels of Monetary Transmission," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 901-21, September.
  9. Laurence Ball & N. Gregory Mankiw, 1992. "Asymmetric Price Adjustment and Economic Fluctuations," NBER Working Papers 4089, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  11. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles L., 1999. "Monetary policy shocks: What have we learned and to what end?," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 65-148 Elsevier.
  12. Peersman, Gert & Smets, Frank, 2001. "The monetary transmission mechanism in the euro area: more evidence from VAR analysis," Working Paper Series 0091, European Central Bank.
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