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Measuring Labour Mismatch in Europe

Author

Listed:
  • António Morgado

    (ISCAL - IPL, Polithecnic Institute of Lisbon)

  • Tiago Neves Sequeira

    () (Universidade da Beira Interior)

  • Marcelo Santos

    (Universidade da Beira Interior)

  • Alexandra Ferreira-Lopes

    (Instituto Universitário de Lisboa, ISCTE-IUL
    CEFAGE-UBI)

  • Ana Balcão Reis

    (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)

Abstract

Abstract We calculate aggregate and comparable measures of mismatch in the labour market for 30 European countries. These indicators measure vertical mismatch (related to the level of education, e.g. overeducation, and undereducation) and horizontal mismatch (related to the field of education) and are comparable across countries and through time. In European countries, between 15 % to nearly 35 % of workers have a job for which they have more (or less) qualifications than the usual level. Approximately 20 % to nearly 50 % work in a job for which they do not have the usual field qualification. There is a great variability on mismatch across European labour markets. Undereducation affects more workers than overeducation in most European countries. Low correlations between mismatch and unemployment indicate that mismatch should be regarded as an additional informative variable, thus useful to characterize labour markets.

Suggested Citation

  • António Morgado & Tiago Neves Sequeira & Marcelo Santos & Alexandra Ferreira-Lopes & Ana Balcão Reis, 2016. "Measuring Labour Mismatch in Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 129(1), pages 161-179, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:129:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-015-1097-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-015-1097-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mariya Neycheva, 2016. "Secondary versus higher education for growth: the case of three countries with different human capital’s structure and quality," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(6), pages 2367-2393, November.
    2. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1423-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. R. Giuliano & B. Mahy & F. Rycx & G. Vermeylen, 2017. "Does corporate social responsibility make over-educated workers more productive?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(6), pages 587-605, February.
    4. Olga Kupets, 2015. "Skill mismatch and overeducation in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 224-224, December.
    5. Mariya Neycheva, 2015. "Impact of Secondary and Tertiary Education on Economic Growth: a Co-integration Model for Bulgaria," Economic Studies journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 4, pages 82-106.
    6. Olga Kupets, 2015. "Education in transition and job mismatch: Evidence from the skills survey in non-EU transition economies," KIER Working Papers 915, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Overeducation; Undereducation; Mismatch; Labour market;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O50 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - General

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