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Immigration and Swiss House Prices

Author

Listed:
  • Kathrin Degen

    () (State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO)

  • Andreas M. Fischer

    () (Swiss National Bank)

Abstract

Summary This study examines the behavior of Swiss house prices in relation to immigration flows for 85 regions from 2001 to 2006. The results show that the nexus between immigration and house prices holds even in an environment of low house price inflation and modest immigration flows. An immigration inflow equal to 1 % of an area’s population is coincident with an increase in prices for single-family homes of about 2.7 %, a result consistent with previous studies. The overall immigration effect for single-family houses captures almost two-thirds of the total price increase.

Suggested Citation

  • Kathrin Degen & Andreas M. Fischer, 2017. "Immigration and Swiss House Prices," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics, Springer;Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics, vol. 153(1), pages 15-36, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:sjecst:v:153:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_bf03399433
    DOI: 10.1007/BF03399433
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    F22; J61; R21;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand

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