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China’s energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions: do carbon emission reduction paths matter?

Author

Listed:
  • Xiaofei Han

    (Hefei University of Technology)

  • Jianling Jiao

    (Hefei University of Technology)

  • Lancui Liu

    () (Beijing Normal University
    Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People’s Republic of China
    Harvard University)

  • Lanlan Li

    (Hefei University of Technology)

Abstract

To investigate the impact of carbon emission reduction paths on energy demand and CO2 emissions in China, in this study, quantitative carbon emission reduction paths in the period 2014–2020 are established by decomposing the target for emissions reduction. An optimization model of energy demand, into which reduction paths are incorporated, is then constructed from a goal-oriented perspective. The results suggest that energy consumption varies under different emission reduction paths. Coal demand is found to be much more sensitive to the choice of emission reduction path than other forms of energy; in particular, it responds strongly to the decreasing reduction path. We conclude that the decreasing reduction path is a better means than the increasing reduction path of achieving China’s emission reduction target for 2020 with the least amount of energy and the least amount of CO2 emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiaofei Han & Jianling Jiao & Lancui Liu & Lanlan Li, 2017. "China’s energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions: do carbon emission reduction paths matter?," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 86(3), pages 1333-1345, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:86:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11069-017-2747-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s11069-017-2747-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Feng Dong & Yifei Hua & Bolin Yu, 2018. "Peak Carbon Emissions in China: Status, Key Factors and Countermeasures—A Literature Review," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(8), pages 1-34, August.

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