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Agglomeration, job flows and unemployment

  • John Francis


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    Article provided by Springer in its journal The Annals of Regional Science.

    Volume (Year): 43 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 181-198

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:43:y:2009:i:1:p:181-198
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    1. Mortensen, Dale T & Pissarides, Christopher A, 1994. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 397-415, July.
    2. Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 1995. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," NBER Working Papers 5098, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Steven J. Davis & John C. Haltiwanger & Scott Schuh, 1998. "Job Creation and Destruction," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262540932, June.
    4. Christopher A. Pissarides & Barbara Petrongolo, 2001. "Looking into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 390-431, June.
    5. Steve J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 1991. "Gross Job Creation, Gross Job Destruction and Employment Reallocation," NBER Working Papers 3728, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Antonio Ricci, Luca, 1999. "Economic geography and comparative advantage:: Agglomeration versus specialization," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 357-377, February.
    7. International Monetary Fund, 2004. "Trade and Industrial Location with Heterogeneous Labor," IMF Working Papers 04/103, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Robin Boadway & Katherine Cuff & Nicolas Marceau, 2004. "Agglomeration Effects and the Competition for Firms," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 11(5), pages 623-645, 09.
    9. Paolo Epifani & Gino Gancia, 2002. "Trade, migration and regional unemployment," Economics Working Papers 832, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Nov 2003.
    10. R. Jason Faberman, 2005. "What’s In a City?: Understanding the Micro-Level Employer Dynamics Underlying Urban Growth," Working Papers 386, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    11. Henderson, J. Vernon, 1986. "Efficiency of resource usage and city size," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 47-70, January.
    12. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Matusz, Steven J, 1996. "International Trade, the Division of Labor, and Unemployment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(1), pages 71-84, February.
    14. John Francis, 2003. "The declining costs of international trade and unemployment," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 337-357.
    15. Barron, John M, 1975. "Search in the Labor Market and the Duration of Unemployment: Some Empirical Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(5), pages 934-42, December.
    16. Sato, Yasuhiro, 2001. "Labor Heterogeneity in an Urban Labor Market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 313-337, September.
    17. Venables, Anthony J, 1996. "Equilibrium Locations of Vertically Linked Industries," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(2), pages 341-59, May.
    18. Raphael Bar-El, 2006. "Inter-regional labor market equilibrium: another pattern of spatial mismatch," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 393-405, June.
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