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Agglomeration Effects and the Competition for Firms

  • Robin Boadway
  • Katherine Cuff
  • Nicolas Marceau

A two-region economy consists of a given but different number of immobile workers in each region, and a given number of mobile firms. Firms create jobs where they locate, but there is frictional unemployment. Two sorts of agglomeration effects arise: those from economies of scale in matching, and those from production economies external to the firm. Regions may either be part of a unitary state in which case all regional policies are decided by the central government, or they may abe part of a federal state in which case some policies are determined by the regional governments. We characterize the resource allocations in both a unitary and a federal state, and identify the set of instruments that are required to replicate the social optimum in each state.

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Paper provided by CIRPEE in its series Cahiers de recherche with number 0324.

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Date of creation: 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:lvl:lacicr:0324
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  1. Robin Boadway & Katherine Cuff & Nicolas Marceau, 2000. "Redistribution and Employment Policies with Endogenous Unemployment," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 121, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
  2. Ludema, Rodney D. & Wooton, Ian, 2000. "Economic geography and the fiscal effects of regional integration," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 331-357, December.
  3. Andreas Haufler & Ian Wooton, . "Country Size and Tax Competition for Foreign Direct Investment," Working Papers 9702, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  4. Kind, Hans Jarle & Schjelderup, Guttorm & Ulltveit-Moe, Karen-Helene, 1999. "Competing for Capital in a 'Lumpy' World," CEPR Discussion Papers 2188, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Wilson, J.D., 1990. "Tax Competition With Interregional Differences In Factor Endowments," Working Papers 4, John Deutsch Institute for the Study of Economic Policy.
  6. P. Diamond, 1980. "Aggregate Demand Management in Search Equilibrium," Working papers 268, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  7. Bucovetsky, S., 1991. "Asymmetric tax competition," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 167-181, September.
  8. Johnson, G.E. & Layard, P.R.G., 1987. "The natural rate of unemployment: Explanation and policy," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 16, pages 921-999 Elsevier.
  9. Robin Boadway & Katherine Cuff & Nicolas Marceau, 2002. "Inter-Jurisdictional Competition for Firms," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(3), pages 761-782, August.
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