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The Diffusion of ICTs and Growth of the French Economy over the Long-term, 1980-2000


  • Gilbert Cette


  • Jacques Mairesse


  • Yusuf Kocoglu



Major European countries, unlike the United States, did not experience an acceleration in labour productivity growth in the second half of the 1990s. In this article, Gilbert Cette from the Bank of France and the University of Aix-Marseilles II, Jacques Mairesse of INSEE-CREST, and Yusef Kocoglu of the University of Aix-Marseilles provide a detailed growth accounting of the impact of diffusion of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on economic growth in France over the 1980-2000 period. They find that total factor productivity growth picked up considerably in the second half of the 1990s relative to the first half, but that labour productivity growth actually decelerated. This latter development was related to the more than 2 percentage point turnaround in employment growth, in part caused by policies aimed at enhancing the employment component of growth, such as the 35 hour week. They estimate that the contribution of ICTs to output and productivity growth has been sizeable in France, but much less than in the United States, in part because of the smaller size of the French ICT sector. But they argue that having a large ICT-producing sector is not a necessary condition to obtain the full benefits from ICT use and conclude that the ICT contribution to growth in France and other European countries could increase significantly in coming years.

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  • Gilbert Cette & Jacques Mairesse & Yusuf Kocoglu, 2002. "The Diffusion of ICTs and Growth of the French Economy over the Long-term, 1980-2000," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 4, pages 27-38, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:sls:ipmsls:v:4:y:2002:3

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Nicholas Oulton, 2002. "ICT and Productivity Growth in the United Kingdom," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(3), pages 363-379.
    2. Nathalie Greenana & Jacques Mairesse, 2000. "Computers And Productivity In France: Some Evidence," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 275-315.
    3. Jacques Mairesse & Gilbert Cette & Yussuf Kocoglu, 2000. "Les technologies de l'information et de la communication en France : diffusion et contribution à la croissance," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 339(1), pages 117-146.
    4. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 49-74, Fall.
    5. Paul Schreyer, 2000. "The Contribution of Information and Communication Technology to Output Growth: A Study of the G7 Countries," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers 2000/2, OECD Publishing.
    6. Dale W. Jorgenson, 2001. "Information Technology and the U.S. Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 1-32, March.
    7. Barry P. Bosworth & Jack E. Triplett, 2001. "What's New About the New Economy? IT, Economic Growth and Productivity," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 2, pages 19-30, Spring.
    8. Stiroh, Kevin J, 1998. "Computers, Productivity, and Input Substitution," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(2), pages 175-191, April.
    9. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: U.S. Economic Growth in the Information Age," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 31(1), pages 125-236.
    10. W. Erwin Diewert & Kevin J. Fox, 1999. "Can measurement error explain the productivity paradox?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(2), pages 251-280, April.
    11. Jacques Mairesse & Nathalie Greenan & Agnes Topiol-Bensaid, 2001. "Information Technology and Research and Development Impacts on Productivity and Skills: Looking for Correlations on French Firm Level Data," NBER Working Papers 8075, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2000. "Beyond Computation: Information Technology, Organizational Transformation and Business Performance," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 23-48, Fall.
    13. Christopher J. Gust & Jaime R. Marquez, 2000. "Productivity developments abroad," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Oct, pages 665-681.
    14. Gilbert Cette & Jacques Mairesse & Yussuf Kocoglu, 2000. "La mesure de l'investissement en technologies de l'information et de la communication : quelques considérations méthodologiques," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 339(1), pages 73-91.
    15. Dale W. Jorgenson, 2001. "Information Technology and the U. S. Economy," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1911, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    16. Bruno Crépon & Thomas Heckel, 2000. "La contribution de l'informatisation à la croissance française : une mesure à partir des données d'entreprises," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 339(1), pages 93-115.
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    Cited by:

    1. Benoit A. Aubert & Blaize Horner Reich, 2009. "Extracting Value From Information Technologies," CIRANO Burgundy Reports 2009rb-04, CIRANO.
    2. Tahir Mahmood, 2012. "Labour Productivity Convergence in 52 Industries: A Panel Data Analysis of Some European Countries," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 2(3), pages 320-339.
    3. Martin Aarøe Christensen, 2015. "A CGE model with ICT and R&D-driven endogenous growth: A detailed model description," JRC Working Papers JRC97908, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).

    More about this item


    France; Productivity; Growth; ICT; Information; Communication; Technology; Labour Productivity; Labor Productivity; Multifactor Productivity; Multi-factor Productivity; Total Factor Productivity; Innovation; Acceleration;

    JEL classification:

    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • E66 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General Outlook and Conditions
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity


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