IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ren/journl/v4y2012i1p39-51.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

On the incentives to increase input efficiency under monopoly trade unions

Author

Listed:
  • Tapan Biswas

    (Centre for Economic Policy, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX, UK)

  • Jolian McHardy

    (Department of Economics, University of Sheffield, 9 Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 4DT, UK)

Abstract

(Originally published in the Journal of Economic Behaviour and Organization 2007, 62(4), 657-669) - We examine the effects of and the incentives for increasing input efficiency within a spatially segregated Cournot duopoly with monopoly trade unions whose utility functions depend on both wages and employment. We show that with neoclassical as well as Leontief technology, unions raise wages to appropriate fully the gains from labor-saving technological (or organisational) improvements, leaving the firm with no incentive to invest in increasing the efficiency of workers. However, capital-saving technological improvement may be profitable depending on the elasticity of substitution. Finally, we examine the implication of a fixed minimum wage (or competitive labor market) in one country. - © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation

  • Tapan Biswas & Jolian McHardy, 2012. "On the incentives to increase input efficiency under monopoly trade unions," Review of Economic Analysis, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, vol. 4(1), pages 39-51, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ren:journl:v:4:y:2012:i:1:p:39-51
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://rofea.org/index.php?journal=journal&page=article&op=view&path%5B%5D=73&path%5B%5D=70
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Duncan, Greg J & Stafford, Frank P, 1980. "Do Union Members Receive Compensating Wage Differentials?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 355-371, June.
    2. Calabuig, Vicente & Gonzalez-Maestre, Miguel, 2002. "Union structure and incentives for innovation," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 177-192, March.
    3. Biswas, Tapan & McHardy, Jolian P., 2003. "The long-run effect of a wage policy on employment," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 267-273, April.
    4. Addison, John T & Chilton, John B, 1998. "Self-Enforcing Union Contracts: Efficient Investment and Employment," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 71(3), pages 349-369, July.
    5. Dowrick, Steve & Spencer, Barbara J, 1994. "Union Attitudes to Labor-Saving Innovation: When Are Unions Luddites?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(2), pages 316-344, April.
    6. Maria Paz Espinosa & Changyong Rhee, 1989. "Efficient Wage Bargaining as a Repeated Game," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 104(3), pages 565-588.
    7. Rowthorn, Robert, 1999. "Unemployment, Wage Bargaining and Capital-Labour Substitution," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(4), pages 413-425, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Unions; Technological change; Cournot duopoly;

    JEL classification:

    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J51 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Trade Unions: Objectives, Structure, and Effects
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ren:journl:v:4:y:2012:i:1:p:39-51. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dr. Jerzy (Jurek) Konieczny). General contact details of provider: http://www.rcfea.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.