IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/red/issued/18-282.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Use of Collateral in Bilateral Repurchase and Securities Lending Agreements

Author

Listed:
  • Viktoria Baklanova

    (Office of Financial Research)

  • Cecilia Caglio

    (Federal Reserve Board of Governors)

  • Marco Cipriani

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Adam Copeland

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

Abstract

We use unique data from U.S. BHC-affiliated securities dealers to study the use of collateral in bilateral repurchase and securities lending agreements. This is the first paper to provide stylized facts about this market, documenting, among other things, that most trades are backed by U.S. Treasuries and equities, and have either an overnight or open maturity. We also focus on how haircuts are determined in this market, highlighting the differences across asset classes. Finally, we document a negative correlation between haircut and interest rate, a prediction in line with a large set of theories; however this correlation is quite small in magnitude. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Viktoria Baklanova & Cecilia Caglio & Marco Cipriani & Adam Copeland, 2019. "The Use of Collateral in Bilateral Repurchase and Securities Lending Agreements," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 228-249, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:18-282
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2019.05.002
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.red.2019.05.002
    Download Restriction: Access to full texts is restricted to ScienceDirect subscribers and institutional members. See http://www.sciencedirect.com/ for details.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.red.2019.05.002?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos, 2012. "Leverage and Default in Binomial Economies: A Complete Characterization," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1877RRR, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Mar 2015.
    2. Viktoria Baklanova & Cecilia Caglio & Frank Keane & Burt Porter, 2016. "A Pilot Survey of Agent Securities Lending Activity," Working Papers 16-08, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury.
    3. Viktoria Baklanova & Adam Copeland & Rebecca McCaughrin, 2015. "Reference Guide to U.S. Repo and Securities Lending Markets," Working Papers 15-17, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury.
    4. Gromb, Denis & Vayanos, Dimitri, 2002. "Equilibrium and welfare in markets with financially constrained arbitrageurs," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2-3), pages 361-407.
    5. Antoine Martin & David Skeie & Ernst-Ludwig von Thadden, 2014. "Repo Runs," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(4), pages 957-989.
    6. Nicolae Gârleanu & Lasse Heje Pedersen, 2011. "Margin-based Asset Pricing and Deviations from the Law of One Price," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(6), pages 1980-2022.
    7. Brian Begalle & Antoine Martin & James McAndrews & Susan McLaughlin, 2016. "The Risk Of Fire Sales In The Tri-Party Repo Market," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(3), pages 513-530, July.
    8. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Lasse Heje Pedersen, 2009. "Market Liquidity and Funding Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(6), pages 2201-2238, June.
    9. Piero Gottardi & Vincent Maurin & Cyril Monnet, 2019. "A theory of repurchase agreements, collateral re-use, and repo intermediation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 30-56, July.
    10. Tobias Adrian & Brian Begalle & Adam Copeland & Antoine Martin, 2013. "Repo and Securities Lending," NBER Chapters, in: Risk Topography: Systemic Risk and Macro Modeling, pages 131-148, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos, 2015. "Leverage and Default in Binomial Economies: A Complete Characterization," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 83, pages 2191-2229, November.
    12. Duffie, Darrell, 1996. "Special Repo Rates," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(2), pages 493-526, June.
    13. Gorton, Gary & Metrick, Andrew, 2012. "Securitized banking and the run on repo," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 425-451.
    14. Chan, Yuk-Shee & Kanatas, George, 1985. "Asymmetric Valuations and the Role of Collateral in Loan Agreements," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 17(1), pages 84-95, February.
    15. Arvind Krishnamurthy & Stefan Nagel & Dmitry Orlov, 2014. "Sizing Up Repo," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(6), pages 2381-2417, December.
    16. Besanko, David & Thakor, Anjan V., 1987. "Competitive equilibrium in the credit market under asymmetric information," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 167-182, June.
    17. Fleming, Michael J. & Garbade, Kenneth D., 2007. "Dealer behavior in the specials market for US Treasury securities," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 204-228, April.
    18. Chan, Yuk-Shee & Greenbaum, Stuart I. & Thakor, Anjan V., 1986. "Information reusability, competition and bank asset quality," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 243-253, June.
    19. Jordan, Bradford D & Jordan, Susan D, 1997. "Special Repo Rates: An Empirical Analysis," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(5), pages 2051-2072, December.
    20. Grace Xing Hu & Jun Pan & Jiang Wang, 2015. "Tri-Party Repo Pricing," NBER Working Papers 21502, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Besanko, David & Thakor, Anjan V, 1987. "Collateral and Rationing: Sorting Equilibria in Monopolistic and Competitive Credit Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 28(3), pages 671-689, October.
    22. Piero Gottardi & Vincent Maurin & Cyril Monnet, 2019. "A theory of repurchase agreements, collateral re-use, and repo intermediation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 30-56, July.
    23. Frank M. Keane, 2013. "Securities loans collateralized by cash: reinvestment risk, run risk, and incentive issues," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 19(May).
    24. Buraschi, Andrea & Menini, Davide, 2002. "Liquidity risk and specialness," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 243-284, May.
    25. Adam Copeland & Antoine Martin & Michael Walker, 2014. "Repo Runs: Evidence from the Tri-Party Repo Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(6), pages 2343-2380, December.
    26. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos, 2012. "Leverage and Default in Binomial Economies: A Complete Characterization," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1877R3, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Mar 2015.
    27. John Geanakoplos, 2010. "The Leverage Cycle," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2009, Volume 24, pages 1-65, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    28. Bester, Helmut, 1985. "Screening vs. Rationing in Credit Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 850-855, September.
    29. Infante, Sebastian, 2019. "Liquidity windfalls: The consequences of repo rehypothecation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(1), pages 42-63.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Benjamin Lester & Pierre-Olivier Weill & Ariel Zetlin-Jones, 2019. "RED Special Issue on Fragmented Financial Markets: An Introduction," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 1-3, July.
    2. W. Arrata & B. Nguyen & I. Rahmouni-Rousseau & M. Vari, 2017. "Eurosystem’s asset purchases and money market rates," Working papers 652, Banque de France.
    3. Tomas Breach & Thomas B. King, 2018. "Securities Financing and Asset Markets: New Evidence," Working Paper Series WP-2018-22, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    4. Narayan Bulusu, 2020. "Why Do Central Banks Make Public Announcements of Open Market Operations?," Staff Working Papers 20-35, Bank of Canada.
    5. Kang, Kee-Youn, 2021. "Optimal contract for asset trades: Collateralizing or selling?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 56(C).
    6. William Arrata & Benoit Nguyen & Imene Rahmouni-Rousseau & Miklos Vari, 2018. "The Scarcity Effect of Quantitative Easing on Repo Rates: Evidence from the Euro Area," IMF Working Papers 2018/258, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Bulusu, Narayan & Guérin, Pierre, 2019. "What drives interbank loans? Evidence from Canada," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 427-444.
    8. Grilli, Ruggero & Giri, Federico & Gallegati, Mauro, 2020. "Collateral rehypothecation, safe asset scarcity, and unconventional monetary policy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 633-645.
    9. Gorton, Gary & Laarits, Toomas & Metrick, Andrew, 2020. "The run on repo and the Fed’s response," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 48(C).
    10. Narayan Bulusu & Sermin Gungor, 2021. "The life cycle of trading activity and liquidity of Government of Canada bonds: Evidence from cash, repo and securities lending markets," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 54(2), pages 557-581, May.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Corradin, Stefano & Heider, Florian & Hoerova, Marie, 2017. "On collateral: implications for financial stability and monetary policy," Working Paper Series 2107, European Central Bank.
    2. Infante, Sebastian, 2019. "Liquidity windfalls: The consequences of repo rehypothecation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(1), pages 42-63.
    3. Chang, Jin-Wook, 2021. "Contagion in Debt and Collateral Markets," MPRA Paper 111131, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Corradin, Stefano & Maddaloni, Angela, 2020. "The importance of being special: Repo markets during the crisis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 137(2), pages 392-429.
    5. Feixue Gong & Gregory Phelan, 2020. "Debt collateralization, capital structure, and maximal leverage," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 70(2), pages 579-605, September.
    6. Piero Gottardi & Vincent Maurin & Cyril Monnet, 2019. "A theory of repurchase agreements, collateral re-use, and repo intermediation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 30-56, July.
    7. Ranaldo, Angelo & Rupprecht, Matthias, 2016. "The Forward Premium in Short-Term Rates," Working Papers on Finance 1619, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance, revised Sep 2019.
    8. Arianna Miglietta & Cristina Picillo & Mario Pietrunti, 2015. "The impact of CCPs� margin policies on Repo markets," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1028, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    9. Olav Syrstad, 2020. "Covered Interest Parity in long-dated securities," Working Paper 2020/11, Norges Bank.
    10. Viktoria Baklanova & Adam Copeland & Rebecca McCaughrin, 2015. "Reference guide to U.S. repo and securities lending markets," Staff Reports 740, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    11. Tomas Breach & Thomas B. King, 2018. "Securities Financing and Asset Markets: New Evidence," Working Paper Series WP-2018-22, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    12. Denis Gromb & Dimitri Vayanos, 2018. "The Dynamics of Financially Constrained Arbitrage," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 73(4), pages 1713-1750, August.
    13. Bachmann, Manuel, 2018. "Market Illiquidity, Credit Freezes and Endogenous Funding Constraints," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 255, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    14. Lewis, Kurt F. & Longstaff, Francis A. & Petrasek, Lubomir, 2021. "Asset mispricing," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(3), pages 981-1006.
    15. Stefania D'Amico & Roger Fan & Yuriy Kitsul, 2013. "The Scarcity Value of Treasury Collateral: Repo Market Effects of Security-Specific Supply and Demand Factors," Working Paper Series WP-2013-22, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    16. Nyborg, Kjell G., 2017. "Central bank collateral frameworks," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 198-214.
    17. Fukai, Hiroki, 2021. "Optimal interventions on strategic fails in repo markets," MPRA Paper 106090, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Jean-Sébastien Fontaine & René Garcia & Sermin Gungor, 2015. "Funding Liquidity, Market Liquidity and the Cross-Section of Stock Returns," Staff Working Papers 15-12, Bank of Canada.
    19. Karlis, Alexandros & Galanis, Giorgos & Terovitis, Spyridon & Turner, Matthew, 2015. "Heterogeneity and Clustering of Defaults," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1083, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    20. Asano, Koji, 2018. "Ignorant Experts and Financial Fragility," MPRA Paper 90830, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Repo; Securities lending; Adverse selection; Haircut;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:red:issued:18-282. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/sedddea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Christian Zimmermann (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/sedddea.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.