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Liquidity windfalls: The consequences of repo rehypothecation

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  • Infante, Sebastian

Abstract

This paper presents a model of repo intermediation in which dealers intermediate secured financing between lenders and borrowers using the same collateral. Lenders are insulated from dealers through their repo’s collateral, but borrowers are exposed to dealers through the loss of their collateral. This makes lenders’ repo terms insensitive to dealers’ default, while borrowers’ repo terms are not. The model shows that when repos serve to intermediate collateral, haircuts are negative. This paper explains the difference in haircuts between the bilateral and tri-party repo market and the different run dynamics observed across these markets during the financial crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Infante, Sebastian, 2019. "Liquidity windfalls: The consequences of repo rehypothecation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(1), pages 42-63.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:133:y:2019:i:1:p:42-63
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jfineco.2019.02.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Andolfatto, David & Martin, Fernando M. & Zhang, Shengxing, 2017. "Rehypothecation and liquidity," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 488-505.
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    5. Mitchell, Mark & Pulvino, Todd, 2012. "Arbitrage crashes and the speed of capital," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 469-490.
    6. Piero Gottardi & Vincent Maurin & Cyril Monnet, 2019. "A theory of repurchase agreements, collateral re-use, and repo intermediation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 30-56, July.
    7. Adam Copeland & Antoine Martin & Michael Walker, 2014. "Repo Runs: Evidence from the Tri-Party Repo Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(6), pages 2343-2380, December.
    8. Viktoria Baklanova & Adam Copeland & Rebecca McCaughrin, 2015. "Reference Guide to U.S. Repo and Securities Lending Markets," Working Papers 15-17, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:red:issued:18-282 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Viktoria Baklanova & Cecilia Caglio & Marco Cipriani & Adam Copeland, 2019. "The Use of Collateral in Bilateral Repurchase and Securities Lending Agreements," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 228-249, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Rehypothecation; Repo; Dealer; Liquidity; Default; Collateral;

    JEL classification:

    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage
    • G33 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Bankruptcy; Liquidation

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