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Rehypothecation and Liquidity

Author

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  • Andolfatto, David

    (Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis)

  • Martin, Fernando M.

    () (Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis)

  • Zhang, Shengxing

    (London School of Economics)

Abstract

We develop a dynamic general equilibrium monetary model where a shortage of collateral and incomplete markets motivate the formation of credit relationships and the rehypothecation of assets. Rehypothecation improves resource allocation because it permits liquidity to flow where it is most needed. The liquidity benefits associated with rehypothecation are shown to be more important in high-inflation (high interest rate) regimes. Regulations restricting the practice are shown to have very different consequences depending on how they are designed. Assigning collateral to segregated accounts, as prescribed in the Dodd-Frank Act, is generally welfare-reducing. In contrast, an SEC15c3-3 type regulation can improve welfare through the regulatory premium it confers on cash holdings, which are inefficiently low when interest rates and inflation are high.

Suggested Citation

  • Andolfatto, David & Martin, Fernando M. & Zhang, Shengxing, 2015. "Rehypothecation and Liquidity," Working Papers 2015-3, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 06 Mar 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2015-003
    DOI: 10.20955/wp.2015.003
    Note: The original title was "Rehypothecation"
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andolfatto, David & Martin, Fernando M. & Zhang, Shengxing, 2017. "Rehypothecation and liquidity," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 488-505.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andolfatto, David & Martin, Fernando M. & Zhang, Shengxing, 2017. "Rehypothecation and liquidity," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 488-505.
    2. Berentsen, Aleksander & Huber, Samuel & Marchesiani, Alessandro, 2016. "The societal benefit of a financial transaction tax," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 303-323.
    3. repec:eee:dyncon:v:79:y:2017:i:c:p:184-200 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Geromichalos, Athanasios & Herrenbrueck, Lucas, 2016. "The Strategic Determination of the Supply of Liquid Assets," MPRA Paper 71454, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Duc Thi Luu & Mauro Napoletano & Paolo Barucca & Stefano Battiston, 2018. "Collateral Unchained: Rehypothecation Networks, Concentration and Systemic Effects," GREDEG Working Papers 2018-05, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    6. Huber, Samuel & Kim, Jaehong, 2017. "On the optimal quantity of liquid bonds," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 184-200.
    7. Michael Grill & Karl Schmedders & Felix Kubler & Johannes Brumm, 2017. "Re-use of Collateral: Leverage, Volatility, and Welfare," 2017 Meeting Papers 697, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Vincent Maurin & Cyril Monnet & Piero Gottardi, 2016. "A Theory of Repurchase Agreement, Collateral Re-use, and Repo Intermediation," 2016 Meeting Papers 417, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Duc Thi Luu & Mauro Napoletano & Paolo Barucca & Stefano Battiston, 2018. "Collateral Unchained : Rehypothecation networkd, concentration and systemic effects," Sciences Po publications 2018-07, Sciences Po.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    rehypothecation; money; collateral; credit relationship;

    JEL classification:

    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit

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