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Centralized trading of corporate bonds

Listed author(s):
  • Samuel Huber
  • Jaehong Kim

In the post-crisis period, increased regulation of financial intermediaries has led to a significant decline in corporate bond market liquidity. In order to stabilize these bond markets, policy makers recently proposed that the trading of corporate bonds should be more centralized. In this paper, we show that a centralization of corporate bond markets generally leads to an inferior outcome when compared with the initial over-the-counter structure. The reason is that in a frictionless centralized secondary bond market, the demand for bonds increases by such a magnitude that the return on bonds decreases until equaling the return on money, and hence, the market becomes redundant.

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File URL: http://www.econ.uzh.ch/static/wp/econwp211.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics - University of Zurich in its series ECON - Working Papers with number 211.

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Date of creation: Nov 2015
Date of revision: May 2016
Handle: RePEc:zur:econwp:211
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  1. Berentsen, Aleksander & Huber, Samuel & Marchesiani, Alessandro, 2016. "The societal benefit of a financial transaction tax," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 303-323.
  2. Athanasios Geromichalos & Lucas Herrenbrueck, 2016. "Monetary Policy, Asset Prices, and Liquidity in Over‐the‐Counter Markets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(1), pages 35-79, 02.
  3. Ingo Fender & Ulf Lewrick, 2015. "Shifting tides - market liquidity and market-making in fixed income instruments," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
  4. Ricardo Lagos, 2011. "Asset Prices, Liquidity, and Monetary Policy in an Exchange Economy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 521-552, October.
  5. David Andolfatto, 2011. "A note on the societal benefits of illiquid bonds," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(1), pages 133-147, February.
  6. Stephens, Eric & Thompson, James R., 2014. "CDS as insurance: Leaky lifeboats in stormy seas," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 279-299.
  7. Aleksander Berentsen & Guido Menzio & Randall Wright, 2011. "Inflation and Unemployment in the Long Run," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(1), pages 371-398, February.
  8. Huber, Samuel & Kim, Jaehong, 2017. "On the optimal quantity of liquid bonds," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 184-200.
  9. Berentsen, Aleksander & Camera, Gabriele & Waller, Christopher, 2007. "Money, credit and banking," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 135(1), pages 171-195, July.
  10. Benjamin Lester & Andrew Postlewaite & Randall Wright, 2012. "Information, Liquidity, Asset Prices, and Monetary Policy," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(3), pages 1209-1238.
  11. Jacquet, Nicolas L. & Tan, Serene, 2012. "Money and asset prices with uninsurable risks," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(8), pages 784-797.
  12. Aleksander Berentsen & Samuel Huber & Alessandro Marchesiani, 2014. "Degreasing The Wheels Of Finance," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 55, pages 735-763, 08.
  13. Chun, Youngsub & Thomson, William, 1988. "Monotonicity properties of bargaining solutions when applied to economics," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 11-27, February.
  14. James R. Thompson, 2010. "Counterparty Risk in Financial Contracts: Should the Insured Worry About the Insurer?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(3), pages 1195-1252.
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