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The Financial Accelerator and the Optimal State-Dependent Contract

Author

Listed:
  • Jonathan Hoddenbagh

    (Johns Hopkins University)

  • Mikhail Dmitriev

    (Florida State University)

Abstract

In the financial accelerator literature pioneered by Bernanke, Gertler and Gilchrist (1999) entrepreneurs are myopic and risk-neutral, and loans have a predetermined rate of return by assumption. We relax these assumptions and derive the optimal state-dependent loan contract for forward-looking risk-averse entrepreneurs. We show that financial frictions deliver less amplification under the optimal state-dependent contract. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Hoddenbagh & Mikhail Dmitriev, 2017. "The Financial Accelerator and the Optimal State-Dependent Contract," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 24, pages 43-65, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:15-282
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2016.12.003
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    Cited by:

    1. Fève, Patrick & Moura, Alban & Pierrard, Olivier, 2018. "Predetermined interest rates in an analytical RBC model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 12-15.
    2. Pierluigi Balduzzi & Emanuele Brancati & Marco Brianti & Fabio Schiantarelli, 2020. "The Economic Effects of COVID-19 and Credit Constraints: Evidence from Italian Firms’ Expectations and Plans," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 1013, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 22 Aug 2020.
    3. Stephane Verani, 2018. "Aggregate Consequences of Dynamic Credit Relationships," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 29, pages 44-67, July.
    4. Gong, Liutang & Wang, Chan & Zhao, Fuyang & Zou, Heng-fu, 2017. "Land-price dynamics and macroeconomic fluctuations with nonseparable preferences," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 149-161.
    5. Hansen, James, 2018. "Optimal monetary policy with capital and a financial accelerator," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 84-102.
    6. Candian, Giacomo & Dmitriev, Mikhail, 2020. "Optimal contracts and supply-driven recessions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 197(C).
    7. Luigi Bocola & Guido Lorenzoni, 2020. "Risk Sharing Externalities," NBER Working Papers 26985, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Balduzzi, Pierluigi & Brancati, Emanuele & Brianti, Marco & Schiantarelli, Fabio, 2020. "The Economic Effects of COVID-19 and Credit Constraints: Evidence from Italian Firms' Expectations and Plans," IZA Discussion Papers 13629, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Candian, Giacomo & Dmitriev, Mikhail, 2020. "Default recovery rates and aggregate fluctuations," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 121(C).
    10. Christian Myohl & Yannic Stucki, 2018. "Confidence and the Financial Accelerator," Diskussionsschriften dp1823, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
    11. Giacomo Candian & Mikhail Dmitriev, 2020. "Risk Aversion, Uninsurable Idiosyncratic Risk, and the Financial Accelerator," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 37, pages 299-322, July.
    12. Stephane Verani, 2018. "Aggregate Consequences of Dynamic Credit Relationships," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 29, pages 44-67, July.
    13. Strobel, Johannes & Lee, Gabriel & Dorofeenko, Victor & Salyer, Kevin, 2019. "Time-Varying Risk Shocks and the Zero Lower Bound," VfS Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203491, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial accelerator; Financial frictions; Risk; Optimal contract; Agency costs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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