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Early childhood education expenditures and the intergenerational persistence of income

Author

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  • William Blankenau

    (Kansas State University)

  • Xiaoyan Youderian

    (Xavier University)

Abstract

We consider the extent to which cross-country differences in the intergenerational persistence of income can be explained by differences in government spending on early childhood education. We build a life-cycle model where human capital is accumulated in early, middle and late childhood. Both families and the government can increase the human capital of young agents by investing in education at each stage of childhood. Ability in each dynasty and wages per unit of human capital are stochastic. Different realizations of these values and the resultant education spending histories generate a stochastic steady-state distribution of income. Government spending can reduce persistence by weakening the link between parental income and education spending for a child. Our results show that doubling early childhood spending in the U.S. to match levels in Norway and Denmark eliminates less than 9 percent of the gap in intergenerational income persistence. Increased government education spending in later childhood has almost no effect on persistence. Early childhood expenditures can have a larger effect when allocated to low income families. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • William Blankenau & Xiaoyan Youderian, 2015. "Early childhood education expenditures and the intergenerational persistence of income," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(2), pages 334-349, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:12-190
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2014.06.001
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    3. Gahramanov, Emin & Hasanov, Rashad & Tang, Xueli, 2020. "Parental involvement and Children's human capital: A tax-subsidy experiment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 16-29.
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    5. Hellier, Joël, 2017. "Stratified higher education,social mobility at the top and efficiency: The case of the French ‘Grandes écoles’," MPRA Paper 76724, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Christopher Rauh, 2015. "The Political Economy of Early and College Education - Can Voting Bend the Great Gatsby Curve?," 2015 Meeting Papers 82, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Brotherhood, Luiz & Delalibera, Bruno R., 2020. "Minding the gap between schools and universities," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).
    8. Vera Tolstova, 2021. "Marital Sorting and Cross-Country Differences in Intergenerational Earnings Persistence," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp680, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Government education expenditures; Life-cycle model; Early childhood education; Intergenerational persistence of earnings;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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