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Government education expenditures in early and late childhood

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  • Abington, Casey
  • Blankenau, William

Abstract

Human capital investment in early childhood can lead to large and persistent gains. Beyond this window of opportunity, human capital accumulation is more costly. Despite compelling evidence in support of this notion, government education spending is allocated disproportionately toward late childhood and young adulthood. We consider the consequences of a reallocation using an overlapping generations model with private and public spending on early and late childhood education. Taking as given the higher returns to early childhood investment, we find that the current allocation may nonetheless be appropriate. When we consider a homogeneous population, this can hold for moderate levels of government spending. With heterogeneity, this can hold for middle income workers. Lower income workers, by contrast, may benefit from a reallocation.

Suggested Citation

  • Abington, Casey & Blankenau, William, 2013. "Government education expenditures in early and late childhood," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 854-874.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:37:y:2013:i:4:p:854-874
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jedc.2012.12.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blankenau, William, 2005. "Public schooling, college subsidies and growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 487-507, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ferreira, Pedro Cavalcanti & Delalibera, Bruno Ricardo, 2016. "Economic growth and complementarity between stages of human capital," FGV EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 779, FGV EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    2. Katsuyuki Naito & Keigo Nishida, 2017. "Multistage public education, voting, and income distribution," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 120(1), pages 65-78, January.
    3. Delalibera, Bruno Ricardo & Ferreira, Pedro Cavalcanti, 2018. "Early childhood education and economic growth," FGV EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 802, FGV EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    4. repec:eee:dyncon:v:98:y:2019:i:c:p:82-104 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. William Blankenau & Xiaoyan Youderian, 2015. "Early childhood education expenditures and the intergenerational persistence of income," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(2), pages 334-349, April.
    6. Werner, Katharina & Prettner, Klaus, 2015. "Public education and R&D-based economic growth," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112997, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. George Economides & Hyun Park & Apostolis Philippopoulos & Stelios Sakkas, 2015. "On the Composition of Public Spending and Taxes," CESifo Working Paper Series 5510, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Government education expenditures; Human capital; Heterogeneous agents; Life-cycle model;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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