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Management in education systems

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  • Yue-Yi Hwa
  • Clare Leaver

Abstract

There is increasing interest in measuring management in schools. This paper discusses a popular measurement tool: the World Management Survey (WMS) for schools. Drawing on WMS data, secondary sources, and the recent literature on school management, we take stock of the WMS and make recommendations for its use in future research and policy. We conclude that the WMS remains a highly useful tool for its stated purpose—the standardized measurement of (a subset of) management practices within schools—and make two sets of recommendations. First, we encourage those seeking to benchmark management practices in schools to take a systems perspective by extending the WMS approach upwards into the education bureaucracy. Second, when measuring practices within schools, we recommend that researchers consider: how best to assess alignment across practices in the operations domain; the challenge of measuring student learning for monitoring and target-setting; and the context specificity of people management.

Suggested Citation

  • Yue-Yi Hwa & Clare Leaver, 2021. "Management in education systems," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press and Oxford Review of Economic Policy Limited, vol. 37(2), pages 367-391.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:37:y:2021:i:2:p:367-391.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oxrep/grab004
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    1. Sandra McNally & Luis Schmidt & Anna Valero, 2022. "Do management practices matter in further education?," POID Working Papers 026, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Mundy, Karen, 2023. "SDG4 and state capacity: The missing link," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 103(C).
    3. McNally, Sandra & Schmidt Rivera, Luis & Sivropoulos-Valero, Anna Valero, 2024. "Do management practices matter in further education?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 122360, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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