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Recent Immigration and Economic Outcomes in Rural America

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  • Mark D. Partridge
  • Dan S. Rickman
  • Kamar Ali

Abstract

This paper assessed how recent immigrant flows have affected non-metropolitan county labor market outcomes over the 2000-2005 period. We find the largest impact to be increased net out-migration of natives in the more remote rural counties. Dramatically less out-migration of natives occurred in manufacturing-dependent counties, which also experienced reduced employment rates suggesting greater job queuing. Immigration was positively associated with net migration in persistently high-poverty counties. Given the general absence of statistically significant adverse impacts on other labor market outcomes in these counties, it is possible that immigration helps to revitalize persistently high-poverty counties, although point estimates suggested out-migration may have been insufficient to equalize real wages.
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Suggested Citation

  • Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman & Kamar Ali, 2008. "Recent Immigration and Economic Outcomes in Rural America," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1326-1333.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:90:y:2008:i:5:p:1326-1333
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8276.2008.01225.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman & Kamar Ali & M. Rose Olfert, 2008. "The Geographic Diversity of U.S. Nonmetropolitan Growth Dynamics: A Geographically Weighted Regression Approach," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 84(2), pages 241-266.
    2. John DiNardo & David Card, 2000. "Do Immigrant Inflows Lead to Native Outflows?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 360-367, May.
    3. Saiz, Albert, 2007. "Immigration and housing rents in American cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 345-371, March.
    4. William H. Frey, 1995. "Immigration and Internal Migration 'Flight' from US Metropolitan Areas: Toward a New Demographic Balkanisation," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 32(4-5), pages 733-757, May.
    5. Anonymous, 1996. "Research Updates," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 27(1), February.
    6. Diana Hicks & J Sylvan Katz, 1996. "Hospitals: The hidden research system," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(5), pages 297-304, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S. & Olfert, M. Rose & Ali, Kamar, 2012. "Dwindling U.S. internal migration: Evidence of spatial equilibrium or structural shifts in local labor markets?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 375-388.
    2. Nikolaj Malchow-Møller & Jakob Roland Munch & Claus Aastrup Seidelin & Jan Rose Skaksen, 2013. "Immigrant Workers and Farm Performance: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 95(4), pages 819-841.
    3. Kamar Ali & Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 2012. "International immigration and domestic out-migrants: are domestic migrants moving to new jobs or away from immigrants?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, pages 397-415.
    4. Grace Melo & Gregory Colson & Octavio A. Ramirez, 2014. "Hispanic American Opinions toward Immigration and Immigration Policy Reform Proposals," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 36(4), pages 604-622.
    5. Mark D., Partridge & Dan S., Rickman & M. Rose, Olfert & Kamar, Ali, 2010. "Dwindling U.S. Internal Migration: Evidence of Spatial Equilibrium?," MPRA Paper 28157, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan & Olfert, M. Rose & Tan, Ying, 2013. "International Trade and Local Labor Markets: Are Foreign and Domestic Shocks Created Differently?," MPRA Paper 53407, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr, 2011. "Economic Impacts of Immigration: A Survey," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 1-32, Spring.
    8. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman & M. Rose Olfert & Ying Tan, 2017. "International trade and local labor markets: Do foreign and domestic shocks affect regions differently?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(2), pages 375-409.
    9. Bakens, J. & Nijkamp, P., 2011. "Lessons from migration impact analysis," Serie Research Memoranda 0022, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    10. Simonetta Longhi & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2009. "Regional Economic Impacts of Immigration: A Review," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-047/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 23 Jul 2009.
    11. Alessandra Faggian & Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 2012. "Cultural avoidance and internal migration in the USA: do the source countries matter?," Chapters,in: Migration Impact Assessment, chapter 6, pages 203-224 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. S. Longhi & P. Nijkamp & J. Poot, 2010. "Joint impacts of immigration on wages and employment: review and meta-analysis," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 355-387, December.
    13. Alessandra Faggian & Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 2012. "Cultural avoidance and internal migration in the USA: do the source countries matter?," Chapters,in: Migration Impact Assessment, chapter 6, pages 203-224 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    14. Matthias Schündeln, 2014. "Are Immigrants More Mobile Than Natives? Evidence From Germany," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 70-95, January.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R00 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General - - - General

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