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The Labour Market Impact of Recent Immigration on Ethnic Groups in The UK

  • Ken Clark

    (University of Manchester and IZA, Bonn)

  • Stephen Drinkwater

    (Swansea University and IZA, Bonn)

The UK experienced has unprecedented levels of immigration in the last decade. These inflows were particularly pronounced following EU enlargement in May 2004, since when the UK has received a huge influx of migrants from Central and Eastern Europe. Although existing studies have suggested that the impact of these migration flows on the UK labour market in general has been small, little is known about the effect on particular demographic sub-groups. We begin to fill this void by examining the effect of recent immigration on the labour market experiences of individuals from different ethnic groups. This analysis is important because of the labour market disadvantages that certain minority groups have previously encountered, the continued rapid population growth experienced by some groups and concerns regarding social cohesion. Using the Labour Force Survey, our econometric estimates suggest that recent immigration has had a small negative impact on labour market outcomes, with a slightly greater effect on native born whites compared to ethnic minorities, although some variation is also found between minority groups.

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Article provided by Nordic Journal of Political Economy in its journal Nordic Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 35 (2009)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 4

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Handle: RePEc:noj:journl:v:35:y:2009:p:4
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  1. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve Is Downward Sloping: Reexamining The Impact Of Immigration On The Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374, November.
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  8. Christian Dustmann & Francesca Fabbri, 2005. "Immigrants in the British labour market," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 26(4), pages 423-470, December.
  9. George J. Borjas & Jeffrey Grogger & Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Immigration and African-American Employment Opportunities: The Response of Wages, Employment, and Incarceration to Labor Supply Shocks," NBER Working Papers 12518, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. David Card, 1989. "The Impact of the Mariel Boatlift on the Miami Labor Market," Working Papers 633, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  11. George J. Borjas, 1987. "Immigrants, minorities, and labor market competition," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 40(3), pages 382-392, April.
  12. Winegarden, C R & Khor, Lay Boon, 1991. "Undocumented Immigration and Unemployment of U.S. Youth and Minority Workers: Econometric Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(1), pages 105-12, February.
  13. Leslie, Derek & Drinkwater, Stephen, 1999. "Staying on in Full-Time Education: Reasons for Higher Participation Rates among Ethnic Minority Males and Females," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(261), pages 63-77, February.
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