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Labour Market Effects of Eastern European Migration in Wales

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  • Sara Lemos

Abstract

type="main"> The enlargement of the European Union in May 2004 triggered a relatively large and rapid migration inflow into Wales which was concentrated into narrow districts and occupations. We found little evidence that the inflow of migrants contributed to a fall in wages or a rise in claimant unemployment in Wales between 2004 and 2006. In particular, we found no evidence of an adverse impact on young, female or low-skilled claimant unemployment and no evidence of an adverse impact on the wages of the low-paid.

Suggested Citation

  • Sara Lemos, 2014. "Labour Market Effects of Eastern European Migration in Wales," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82(5), pages 524-548, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:82:y:2014:i:5:p:524-548
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/manc.12033
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Howley, P.; & Moro, M.; & Waqas, M.; & Delaney, L.; & Heron, T.;, 2018. "Immigration and self-reported well-being in the UK," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 18/12, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Ivlevs, Artjoms & Veliziotis, Michail, 2015. "Local-Level Immigration and Life Satisfaction: The EU Enlargement Experience in England and Wales," IZA Discussion Papers 9513, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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