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The political economy of fertility

  • Thorsten Janus

    ()

This paper studies the political economy of fertility. Specifically, I argue that fertility may be a strategic choice for ethnic groups engaged in redistributive conflict. I first present a simple conflict model where high fertility is optimal for each ethnic group if and only if the economy’s ethnic diversity is high, institutions are weak, or both. I then test the model in a cross-national dataset. Consistent with the theory, I find that economies where the product of ethnic diversity and a measure of institutional weakness is high have increased fertility rates. I conclude that fertility may depend on political factors. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11127-011-9879-7
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Public Choice.

Volume (Year): 155 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 493-505

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Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:155:y:2013:i:3:p:493-505
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