IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/jproda/v53y2020i3d10.1007_s11123-020-00576-8.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Do manufacturing entrepreneurs in Australia have (or develop) a productivity advantage?

Author

Listed:
  • Sasan Bakhtiari

    () (Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University)

Abstract

Young firms are integral to productivity enhancing resources reallocation. However, manufacturing entrepreneurs in Australia are quite unproductive upon entry. Yet, the productivity of those that survive makes a quantum leap in one year and converges to that of the mature firms. Those entrepreneurs that grow substantially by age three, termed as transformative, have a major productivity advantage. Interesting productivity dynamics are also afoot for entrepreneurs located within clusters of firms and patents that lead to productivity advantages. These firms are the ones contributing the most to resources reallocation. The findings shed light on a multitude of externalities affecting the productivity of young firms and have implications for the related government policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Sasan Bakhtiari, 2020. "Do manufacturing entrepreneurs in Australia have (or develop) a productivity advantage?," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 53(3), pages 321-338, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jproda:v:53:y:2020:i:3:d:10.1007_s11123-020-00576-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s11123-020-00576-8
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11123-020-00576-8
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pierre‐Philippe Combes & Gilles Duranton & Laurent Gobillon & Diego Puga & Sébastien Roux, 2012. "The Productivity Advantages of Large Cities: Distinguishing Agglomeration From Firm Selection," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 80(6), pages 2543-2594, November.
    2. Jan De Loecker & Frederic Warzynski, 2012. "Markups and Firm-Level Export Status," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(6), pages 2437-2471, October.
    3. Daniel Garcia‐Macia & Chang‐Tai Hsieh & Peter J. Klenow, 2019. "How Destructive Is Innovation?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 87(5), pages 1507-1541, September.
    4. John Haltiwanger & Ron S. Jarmin & Robert Kulick & Javier Miranda, 2016. "High Growth Young Firms: Contribution to Job, Output, and Productivity Growth," NBER Chapters, in: Measuring Entrepreneurial Businesses: Current Knowledge and Challenges, pages 11-62, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Sasan Bakhtiari, 2019. "Entrepreneurship Dynamics in Australia: Lessons from Micro‐data," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 95(308), pages 114-140, March.
    6. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg & Rebecca Henderson, 1993. "Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 577-598.
    7. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, December.
    8. Lucia Foster & John Haltiwanger & Chad Syverson, 2008. "Reallocation, Firm Turnover, and Efficiency: Selection on Productivity or Profitability?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(1), pages 394-425, March.
    9. Marc Cowling & George Tanewski, 2019. "On the productive efficiency of Australian businesses: firm size and age class effects," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 53(3), pages 739-752, October.
    10. Delgado, Mercedes & Porter, Michael E. & Stern, Scott, 2014. "Clusters, convergence, and economic performance," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(10), pages 1785-1799.
    11. Alfons Palangkaraya & Andreas Stierwald & Jongsay Yong, 2009. "Is Firm Productivity Related to Size and Age? The Case of Large Australian Firms," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 167-195, June.
    12. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1982. "Selection and the Evolution of Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(3), pages 649-670, May.
    13. Lucia Foster & John C. Haltiwanger & C. J. Krizan, 2001. "Aggregate Productivity Growth: Lessons from Microeconomic Evidence," NBER Chapters, in: New Developments in Productivity Analysis, pages 303-372, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Murray Brown & Alfred H. Conrad, 1967. "The Influence of Research and Education on CES Production Relations," NBER Chapters, in: The Theory and Empirical Analysis of Production, pages 341-394, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Marc J. Melitz, 2003. "The Impact of Trade on Intra-Industry Reallocations and Aggregate Industry Productivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(6), pages 1695-1725, November.
    16. Glenn Ellison & Edward L. Glaeser & William R. Kerr, 2010. "What Causes Industry Agglomeration? Evidence from Coagglomeration Patterns," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 1195-1213, June.
    17. Robert Breunig & Marn‐Heong Wong, 2008. "A Richer Understanding of Australia's Productivity Performance in the 1990s: Improved Estimates Based Upon Firm‐Level Panel Data," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(265), pages 157-176, June.
    18. Antonelli, Cristiano, 1997. "The economics of path-dependence in industrial organization," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 643-675, October.
    19. Hopenhayn, Hugo A, 1992. "Entry, Exit, and Firm Dynamics in Long Run Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(5), pages 1127-1150, September.
    20. Eric Marcon & Florence Puech, 2010. "Measures of the geographic concentration of industries: improving distance-based methods," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(5), pages 745-762, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Entrepreneurship; Survival; Productivity; Growth; Clusters; Patents;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • L6 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jproda:v:53:y:2020:i:3:d:10.1007_s11123-020-00576-8. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.