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College Student Financial Wellness: Student Loans and Beyond

Author

Listed:
  • Catherine P. Montalto

    () (The Ohio State University)

  • Erica L. Phillips

    (The Ohio State University)

  • Anne McDaniel

    (The Ohio State University)

  • Amanda R. Baker

    (Iowa State University)

Abstract

Financial wellness is multidimensional, incorporating all aspects of a person’s financial situation, including their awareness of their financial situation, goal setting to maintain or improve their current financial situation, and the capability to put these goals into action. This review explores key aspects of college student financial wellness and financial behavior including use of credit cards and student loans, financial literacy, financial stress, and financial self-efficacy. This review also incorporates new information from the multi-institutional Study on Collegiate Financial Wellness, which adds depth to understanding of college student financial wellness in unique ways. Colleges and universities can and should contribute to the ongoing development of the financial capability of the college student population. To effectively plan and implement financial wellness initiatives on campus, understanding the needs of students on our campuses and how finances influence the day-to-day lives of students is critical.

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine P. Montalto & Erica L. Phillips & Anne McDaniel & Amanda R. Baker, 2019. "College Student Financial Wellness: Student Loans and Beyond," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 3-21, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:40:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s10834-018-9593-4
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-018-9593-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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