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The Impact of Personal Finance Education Delivered in High School and College Courses

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Listed:
  • Tzu-Chin Peng

    ()

  • Suzanne Bartholomae

    ()

  • Jonathan Fox

    ()

  • Garrett Cravener

    ()

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of personal finance education delivered in high school and college. Outcomes of interest were investment knowledge and household savings rates measured years after the financial education was delivered. A web-based survey with questions about participation in financial education, financial experiences, income and inheritances, and demographic characteristics was administered to 1,039 alumni from a large midwestern university. Participation in a college level personal finance course was associated with higher levels of investment knowledge. Experience with financial instruments appeared to explain more of the variance in both investment knowledge and savings rates. No significant relationship between taking a high school course and investment knowledge was found. Financial experiences were found to be positively associated with savings rates. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Suggested Citation

  • Tzu-Chin Peng & Suzanne Bartholomae & Jonathan Fox & Garrett Cravener, 2007. "The Impact of Personal Finance Education Delivered in High School and College Courses," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 265-284, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:28:y:2007:i:2:p:265-284
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-007-9058-7
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10834-007-9058-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bernheim, B. Douglas & Garrett, Daniel M. & Maki, Dean M., 2001. "Education and saving:: The long-term effects of high school financial curriculum mandates," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 435-465, June.
    2. Chen, Haiyang & Volpe, Ronald P., 1998. "An Analysis of Personal Financial Literacy Among College Students," Financial Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 107-128.
    3. Ravi Dhar & Ning Zhu, 2006. "Up Close and Personal: Investor Sophistication and the Disposition Effect," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(5), pages 726-740, May.
    4. Fox, Jonathan & Bartholomae, Suzanne, 1999. "Student learning style and educational outcomes: evidence from a family financial management course," Financial Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 235-251.
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