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Towards Understanding Stakeholder Salience Transition and Relational Approach to ‘Better’ Corporate Social Responsibility: A Case for a Proposed Model in Practice

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Listed:
  • Michael O. Erdiaw-Kwasie

    () (University of Southern Queensland)

  • Khorshed Alam

    () (University of Southern Queensland)

  • Md. Shahiduzzaman

    () (University of Southern Queensland)

Abstract

Abstract Management and business literature affirm the role played by stakeholders in corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices as crucial, but what constitutes a true business–society partnership remains relatively unexplored. This paper aims to improve scholarly and management understanding beyond the usual managers’ perceptions on salience attributes, to include how stakeholders can acquire missing attributes to inform a meaningful partnership. In doing this, a model is proposed which conceptualises CSR practices and outcomes within the frameworks of stakeholder salience via empowerment, sustainable corporate social performances and partnership quality. A holistic discussion leads to generation of propositions on stakeholder salience management, corporate social performance, corporate–community partnership systems and CSR practices, which have both academic and management implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael O. Erdiaw-Kwasie & Khorshed Alam & Md. Shahiduzzaman, 2017. "Towards Understanding Stakeholder Salience Transition and Relational Approach to ‘Better’ Corporate Social Responsibility: A Case for a Proposed Model in Practice," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 144(1), pages 85-101, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:144:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10551-015-2805-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s10551-015-2805-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:kap:jbuset:v:152:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s10551-018-3820-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:worbus:v:53:y:2018:i:1:p:52-62 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corporate social responsibility; Stakeholder salience; Stakeholder empowerment; Corporate social performance; Business–society partnership;

    JEL classification:

    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • H7 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory

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