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Urban Structure and Environmental Externalities

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  • Camille Regnier

    (CESAER, Agrosup Dijon, INRA, Université Bourgogne-Franche-Comté)

  • Sophie Legras

    (CESAER, Agrosup Dijon, INRA, Université Bourgogne-Franche-Comté)

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to analyze policy design for air pollution management in the spatial context of urban development. We base our analysis on the paper of Ogawa and Fujita (Reg Sci Urban Econ 12:161–196, 1982), which offers a proper theoretical framework of non-monocentric urban land use using static microeconomic theory where the city structure is endogenous. First, we show that when households internalize industrial pollution in their residential location choice, spatialization within the city is reinforced. This impacts directly the emissions of greenhouse gases from commuting. Then, we analyze policy instruments in order to achieve optimal land use pattern when the policy maker has to manage both industrial and commuting related polluting emissions, that interact through the land market.

Suggested Citation

  • Camille Regnier & Sophie Legras, 2018. "Urban Structure and Environmental Externalities," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 70(1), pages 31-52, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:70:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10640-016-0109-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s10640-016-0109-0
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    Cited by:

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    4. Camille Regnier, 2018. "Open space preservation in an urbanization context," Working Papers 2018.08, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    5. Camille Régnier, 2020. "Open space preservation in an urbanization context," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 443-458, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental externalities; Land use pattern; Air pollution;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns

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