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An Equitable, Efficient and Implementable Scheme to Control Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions

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Abstract

We design an international scheme to control global carbon dioxide emissions in which autonomous developed and developing regions choose their own carbon dioxide emissions in anticipation of interregional resource transfers to be implemented by an international agency. This agency’s objective function obeys a proportional equity principle, which preserves the status-quo relative ranking of regional welfare levels. We show that it is individually rational for each region to participate in our proposed international scheme and that regional environmental authorities choose policies that internalize the global environmental externalities. These results are especially noteworthy in light of the call for international transfers from developed to developing countries in the Kyoto Protocol.

Suggested Citation

  • Arthur Caplan & Emilson Silva, 2002. "An Equitable, Efficient and Implementable Scheme to Control Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions," Working Papers 2002-22, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:usu:wpaper:2002-22
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Henry Tulkens & Parkash Chander, 1997. "The Core of an Economy with Multilateral Environmental Externalities," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, vol. 26(3), pages 379-401.
    2. Wellisch, Dietmar, 1994. "Interregional spillovers in the presence of perfect and imperfect household mobility," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 167-184, October.
    3. Michael Hoel & Kerstin Schneider, 1997. "Incentives to participate in an international environmental agreement," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(2), pages 153-170, March.
    4. Silva, Emilson C. D. & Caplan, Arthur J., 1997. "Transboundary Pollution Control in Federal Systems," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 173-186, October.
    5. Carraro, Carlo & Siniscalco, Domenico, 1993. "Strategies for the international protection of the environment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 309-328.
    6. Richard C. Cornes & Emilson C. D. Silva, 1999. "Rotten Kids, Purity, and Perfection," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(5), pages 1034-1040, October.
    7. Boadway, Robin, 1982. "On the Method of Taxation and the Provision of Local Public Goods: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(4), pages 846-851, September.
    8. Arthur J. Caplan & Richard C. Cornes & Emilson C. D. Silva, 2003. "An ideal Kyoto protocol: emissions trading, redistributive transfers and global participation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 55(2), pages 216-234, April.
    9. Sandler,Todd, 1997. "Global Challenges," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521587495, December.
    10. Caplan, Arthur J. & Silva, Emilson C. D., 1999. "Federal Acid Rain Games," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 25-52, July.
    11. Silva, Emilson C. D., 1997. "Decentralized and Efficient Control of Transboundary Pollution in Federal Systems," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 95-108, January.
    12. Pierre-Andre Chiappori & Ivan Werning, 2002. "Comment on "Rotten Kids, Purity, and Perfection"," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 475-504, April.
    13. Michael Finus, 2004. "Modesty Pays: Sometimes!," Working Papers 2004.68, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    14. Nagase, Yoko & Silva, Emilson C. D., 2000. "Optimal Control of Acid Rain in a Federation with Decentralized Leadership and Information," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 164-180, September.
    15. Michael Finus & Bianca Rundshagen, 2005. "Participation in International Environmental Agreements: The Role of Timing and Regulation," Working Papers 2005.45, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
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    Cited by:

    1. Holland, Luke M. & Doole, Graeme J., 2014. "Implications of fairness for the design of nitrate leaching policy for heterogeneous New Zealand dairy farms," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 79-88.
    2. Yukihiro Nishimura, 2008. "A Lindahl Solution to International Emissions Trading," Working Papers 1177, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    3. Caplan, Arthur J. & Silva, Emilson C.D., 2005. "An efficient mechanism to control correlated externalities: redistributive transfers and the coexistence of regional and global pollution permit markets," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 68-82, January.
    4. Naoto Aoyama & Emilson C. D. Silva, 2010. "Equitable and Efficient Federal Structures with Decentralized Leadership, Spillovers, and Attachment of Heterogeneous Labor," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 12(2), pages 323-343, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy

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