IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/ecopln/v51y2018i2d10.1007_s10644-016-9196-8.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Russian 1998–2007 TFP decomposed: some inspiration emerging from inherited Soviet legacy

Author

Listed:
  • Gregory Brock

    () (Georgia Southern University)

  • Constantin Ogloblin

    (Georgia Southern University)

Abstract

Abstract Using a recently developed stochastic Translog production function frontier model, technical inefficiency, technological progress and returns to scale are examined during Russia’s 1998–2007 cyclical expansion at the branch level including both the market and non-market economy. The service sector plus high skill-intensive goods production is shown to be relatively more efficient than traditional Soviet era goods sectors. Technical efficiency decreases markedly over the expansion while technological progress is quite high (23 %) suggesting an expanding frontier leaving many branches behind as the economy adjusts away from the early transition era. Much greater attention to human capital policies are suggested to foster intensive growth in an environment of low oil and gas prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory Brock & Constantin Ogloblin, 2018. "Russian 1998–2007 TFP decomposed: some inspiration emerging from inherited Soviet legacy," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 51(2), pages 135-151, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ecopln:v:51:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10644-016-9196-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s10644-016-9196-8
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10644-016-9196-8
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jorgenson, Dale W. & Vu, Khuong M., 2010. "Potential growth of the world economy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 615-631, September.
    2. Graham, Loren, 2013. "Lonely Ideas: Can Russia Compete?," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262019795, January.
    3. Gregory Brock & Constantin Ogloblin, 2014. "Another look at technical efficiency in American states, 1979–2000," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 53(2), pages 577-590, September.
    4. repec:zbw:espost:181286 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Bogetic, Zeljko & Olusi, Olasupo, 2013. "Drivers of firm-level productivity in Russia's manufacturing sector," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6572, The World Bank.
    6. Bas Leeuwen & Dmitry Didenko & Péter Földvári, 2015. "Inspiration vs. perspiration in economic development of the Former Soviet Union and China (ca. 1920–2010)," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(1), pages 213-246, January.
    7. Ichiro Iwasaki & Keiko Suganuma, 2015. "Foreign direct investment and regional economic development in Russia: an econometric assessment," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 209-255, November.
    8. Daron Acemoglu & Philippe Aghion & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2006. "Distance to Frontier, Selection, and Economic Growth," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(1), pages 37-74, March.
    9. Domazlicky, Bruce R. & Weber, William, L., 1998. "Determinants of Total Factor Productivity, Technological Change, and Efficiency Differentials Among States, 1977-86," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 28(2), pages 19-34, Fall.
    10. Dreger, Christian & Kholodilin, Konstantin A. & Ulbricht, Dirk & Fidrmuc, Jarko, 2016. "Between the Hammer and the Anvil: The Impact of Economic Sanctions and Oil Prices on Russia’s Ruble," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 295-308.
    11. Gregory Brock, 2001. "An Econometric Look at Inefficiency Among U.S. States, 1977-1986," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 31(1), pages 95-107, Summer.
    12. Davis, Lewis S., 2010. "Institutional flexibility and economic growth," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 306-320, September.
    13. Ville Kaitila, 2016. "GDP growth in Russia: different capital stock series and the terms of trade," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(2), pages 129-145, April.
    14. Amini, Chiara & Nivorozhkin, Eugene, 2015. "The urban–rural divide in educational outcomes: Evidence from Russia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 118-133.
    15. Voskoboynikov, Ilya B., 2012. "New measures of output, labour and capital in industries of the Russian economy," GGDC Research Memorandum GD-123, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.
    16. Oleg Badunenko & Kiril Tochkov, 2010. "Soaring dragons, roaring tigers, growling bears," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(3), pages 539-570, July.
    17. Lovell, C. A. Knox, 1995. "Econometric efficiency analysis: A policy-oriented review," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 452-461, February.
    18. Leonid Gokhberg & Vitaliy Roud, 2016. "Structural changes in the national innovation system: longitudinal study of innovation modes in the Russian industry," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 269-288, August.
    19. Ryzhenkov, Mykola, 2016. "Resource misallocation and manufacturing productivity: The case of Ukraine," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 41-55.
    20. Kumbhakar, Subal C. & Wang, Hung-Jen, 2005. "Estimation of growth convergence using a stochastic production frontier approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 88(3), pages 300-305, September.
    21. Sergey V. Smirnov & Nikolai V. Kondrashov & Anna V. Petronevich, 2016. "Dating Cyclical Turning Points for Russia: Formal Methods and Informal Choices," HSE Working papers WP BRP 122/EC/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Total factor productivity; Russian economy; Economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • O0 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:ecopln:v:51:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10644-016-9196-8. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.