IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Bubble Formation and Heterogeneity of Traders: A Multi-Agent Perspective

  • Shu-Peng Chen

    ()

  • Ling-Yun He

    ()

Financial bubble is an intensively discussed but quite controversial topic. In current literature, the researches usually focus on the (ir)rationality of traders and its impacts on the bubble. We thereby propose a completely different perspective, that is, of traders’ heterogeneity and its impacts on the formation of bubble in financial markets. As in the real financial markets, the agents are always heterogenous. For example, some of them are fundamentalists, some are chartists, some are noise traders, etc. To model the heterogeneity of agents in the real markets, we proposed a multi-agent model to control the constitution of traders. Based on four scenarios with different constitution of traders’ behaviors, we investigated three extreme situations where the market is occupied by homogeneous agents (no matter they are fundamentalists, chartists or noise traders), and one scenario where the market is made up of heterogeneous traders. By applying Log-Periodic Power-Law (LPPL) model, We studied the impacts of different investors’ behaviors on the bubble formation in the market and found that: (a) the public information has an important influence on the beginning of a bubble; (b) traders’ different expectations and their self-feedback is one of reasons for the existence of log-periodicity in bubble; (c) the existence of power–law growth and log-periodicity, which leads the probability of prediction for the bursting of bubble, is caused by the combined effects of public information, traders’ different expectations and their self-feedback. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10614-012-9352-9
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Society for Computational Economics in its journal Computational Economics.

Volume (Year): 42 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (October)
Pages: 267-289

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:kap:compec:v:42:y:2013:i:3:p:267-289
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100248

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. He, Ling-Yun & Fan, Ying & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2009. "Impact of speculator's expectations of returns and time scales of investment on crude oil price behaviors," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 77-84, January.
  2. Carl Chiarella & Giulia Iori & Josep Perello, 2007. "The Impact of Heterogeneous Trading Rules on the Limit Order Book and Order Flows," Papers 0711.3581, arXiv.org.
  3. K. Bastiaensen & P. Cauwels & D. Sornette & R. Woodard & W. -X. Zhou, 2009. "The Chinese Equity Bubble: Ready to Burst," Papers 0907.1827, arXiv.org.
  4. Thomas Lux, 2008. "Applications of Statistical Physics in Finance and Economics," Kiel Working Papers 1425, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  5. Jiang, Zhi-Qiang & Zhou, Wei-Xing & Sornette, Didier & Woodard, Ryan & Bastiaensen, Ken & Cauwels, Peter, 2010. "Bubble diagnosis and prediction of the 2005-2007 and 2008-2009 Chinese stock market bubbles," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 149-162, June.
  6. He, Ling-Yun & Qian, Wen-Bin, 2012. "A Monte Carlo simulation to the performance of the R/S and V/S methods—Statistical revisit and real world application," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 391(14), pages 3770-3782.
  7. He, Ling-Yun & Chen, Shu-Peng, 2011. "A new approach to quantify power-law cross-correlation and its application to commodity markets," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 390(21), pages 3806-3814.
  8. Porter, David P & Smith, Vernon L, 1995. "Futures Contracting and Dividend Uncertainty in Experimental Asset Markets," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 68(4), pages 509-41, October.
  9. Diba, Behzad T & Grossman, Herschel I, 1987. "On the Inception of Rational Bubbles," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 102(3), pages 697-700, August.
  10. Diba, Behzad T & Grossman, Herschel I, 1988. "The Theory of Rational Bubbles in Stock Prices," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(392), pages 746-54, September.
  11. Shiller, Robert J, 1981. "Do Stock Prices Move Too Much to be Justified by Subsequent Changes in Dividends?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 421-36, June.
  12. Ernan Haruvy & Charles N. Noussair, 2006. "The Effect of Short Selling on Bubbles and Crashes in Experimental Spot Asset Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(3), pages 1119-1157, 06.
  13. He, Ling-Yun & Chen, Shu-Peng, 2011. "Nonlinear bivariate dependency of price–volume relationships in agricultural commodity futures markets: A perspective from Multifractal Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 390(2), pages 297-308.
  14. Kenneth D. West, 1986. "A Specification Test for Speculative Bubbles," NBER Working Papers 2067, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Martin Dufwenberg & Tobias Lindqvist & Evan Moore, 2005. "Bubbles and Experience: An Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1731-1737, December.
  16. Blanchard, Olivier Jean, 1979. "Speculative bubbles, crashes and rational expectations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 387-389.
  17. Thomas Stöckl & Jürgen Huber & Michael Kirchler, 2010. "Bubble measures in experimental asset markets," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 284-298, September.
  18. Ling-Yun He, 2010. "Is Price Behavior Scaling and Multiscaling in a Dealer Market? Perspectives from Multi-Agent Based Experiments," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 36(3), pages 263-282, October.
  19. Kenneth A. Froot & Maurice Obstfeld, 1989. "Intrinsic Bubbles: The Case of Stock Prices," NBER Working Papers 3091, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  20. Chen, Shu-Peng & He, Ling-Yun, 2010. "Multifractal spectrum analysis of nonlinear dynamical mechanisms in China’s agricultural futures markets," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 389(7), pages 1434-1444.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:compec:v:42:y:2013:i:3:p:267-289. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Guenther Eichhorn)

or (Christopher F. Baum)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.