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Describing The Fed’S Conduct With Taylor Rules: Is Interest Rate Smoothing Important?

  • Efrem Castelnuovo

In this paper, the author employs models in level and first differences to gain some insights into the presence and significance of the degree of partial adjustment as opposed to a serially correlated policy shock in simple Taylor (1993) rules. In performing the exercise, the author considers potentially important, and usually omitted, regressors such as the quadratic output gap and the credit spread. While it cannot be excluded that serially correlated policy shocks may play a role in describing the federal funds rate path, the findings significantly support the importance of the lagged interest rate also in the 'enriched' Taylor-type models.

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Article provided by IUP Publications in its journal The IUP Journal of Monetary Economics.

Volume (Year): IV (2006)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 57-77

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Handle: RePEc:icf:icfjmo:v:04:y:2006:i:3:p:57-77
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  1. Efrem Castelnuovo & Paolo Surico, 2004. "Model Uncertainty, Optimal Monetary Policy and the Preferences of the Fed," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 51(1), pages 105-126, 02.
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  8. Favero, Carlo A & Rovelli, Riccardo, 2003. " Macroeconomic Stability and the Preferences of the Fed: A Formal Analysis, 1961-98," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(4), pages 545-56, August.
  9. Gerlach, Stefan & Schnabel, Gert, 2000. "The Taylor rule and interest rates in the EMU area," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 165-171, May.
  10. Marvin Goodfriend, 1990. "Interest rates and the conduct of monetary policy," Working Paper 90-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
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  12. Efrem Castelnuovo, 2003. "Squeezing the Interest Rate Smoothing Weight with a Hybrid Expectations Model," Working Papers 2003.6, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
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  16. Surico, Paolo, 2003. "Measuring the time-inconsistency of US monetary policy," Working Paper Series 0291, European Central Bank.
  17. Wieland, Volker, 2000. "Monetary policy, parameter uncertainty and optimal learning," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 199-228, August.
  18. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
  19. Rafael Domenech & Mayte Ledo & David Taguas, 2000. "Some new results on interest rate rules in EMU and in the US," Working Papers 0002, BBVA Bank, Economic Research Department.
  20. Caplin, Andrew & Leahy, John, 1996. "Monetary Policy as a Process of Search," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 689-702, September.
  21. John B. Taylor, 1999. "Monetary Policy Rules," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number tayl99-1, August.
  22. Philip Lowe & Luci Ellis, 1997. "The Smoothing of Official Interest Rates," RBA Annual Conference Volume, in: Philip Lowe (ed.), Monetary Policy and Inflation Targeting Reserve Bank of Australia.
  23. Sharon Kozicki, 1999. "How useful are Taylor rules for monetary policy?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 5-33.
  24. Cukierman, Alex & Gerlach, Stefan, 2003. "The Inflation Bias Revisited: Theory and Some International Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 3761, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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