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The impact of country-level factors on the use of new work practices

  • Ollo-López, Andrea
  • Bayo-Moriones, Alberto
  • Larraza-Kintana, Martín
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    The present work analyses the impact of country-level factors on the use of new work practices such as job rotation, autonomous teams, job autonomy and upward communication. Using employee-level information on 16 European countries from the "Fourth European Working Conditions Survey", the paper shows that the use of these practices is more common in countries with low power distance, high individualism, low masculinity, high uncertainty avoidance, high indirect worker participation and low labour market rigidity. The results help to explain why new work practices vary across countries.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090951610000490
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of World Business.

    Volume (Year): 46 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 3 (July)
    Pages: 394-403

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:worbus:v:46:y:2011:i:3:p:394-403
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    1. Kochan, Thomas A., 1996. "What works at work : overview and assessment," Working papers 3886-96., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    2. Wei Chi & Richard B. Freeman & Morris M. Kleiner, 2011. "Adoption and Termination of Employee Involvement Programs," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 25(1), pages 45-62, 03.
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    4. Olga Tregaskis & Chris Brewster, 2006. "Converging or diverging? A comparative analysis of trends in contingent employment practice in Europe over a decade," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 37(1), pages 111-126, January.
    5. Maury Gittleman & Michael Horrigan & Mary Joyce, 1998. "Flexible workplace practices: Evidence from a nationally representative survey," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(1), pages 99-115, October.
    6. Karen L Newman & Stanley D Nollen, 1996. "Culture and Congruence: The Fit Between Management Practices and national Culture," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 27(4), pages 753-779, December.
    7. Andy C W Chui & Chuck C Y Kwok, 2008. "National culture and life insurance consumption," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 39(1), pages 88-101, January.
    8. James T. Bennett & Bruce E. Kaufman, 2004. "What Do Unions Do?: A Twenty-Year Perspective," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 25(3), pages 339-350, July.
    9. John Godard, 2004. "A Critical Assessment of the High-Performance Paradigm," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 42(2), pages 349-378, 06.
    10. Niraj Dawar & Phillip M Parker & Lydia J Price, 1996. "A Cross-Cultural Study of Interpersonal Information Exchange," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 27(3), pages 497-516, September.
    11. Matias Ramirez & Frederick Guy & David Beale, 2007. "Contested Resources: Unions, Employers, and the Adoption of New Work Practices in US and UK Telecommunications," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(3), pages 495-517, 09.
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