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The Adoption of Job Rotation: Testing the Theories

  • Eriksson, Tor


    (Department of Economics, Aarhus School of Business)

  • Ortega, Jaime


    (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

The aim of this paper is to test three theories for why firms introduce job rotation schemes: employee learning, employer learning, and employee motivation. The earlier literature has made use of either information about establishment characteristics or data coming from personnel records of a single firm. In order to improve upon this, we make use of a unique data set constructed by merging information from a fairly detailed survey directed at Danish private sector firms with a linked employer-employee panel data. This allows us to include firm and workforce characteristics as well as firms HRM practices as explanatory variables, and hence to carry out a more comprehensive analysis.

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Paper provided by University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 04-3.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: 26 May 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:aareco:2004_003
Note: Submitted for publishing in: Industrial and Labor Relations Review
Contact details of provider: Postal: The Aarhus School of Business, Prismet, Silkeborgvej 2, DK 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
Phone: +45 89 486396
Fax: +45 8615 5175
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  1. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 2001. "What's driving the new economy? The benefits of workplace innovation," Staff Reports 118, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  2. Paul Osterman, 1994. "How common is workplace transformation and who adopts it?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 47(2), pages 173-188, January.
  3. Peter Cappelli & David Neumark, 2001. "Do "high-performance" work practices improve establishment-level outcomes?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(4), pages 737-775, July.
  4. Metin M. Cosgel & Thomas J. Miceli, 1999. "Job Rotation: Cost, Benefits, and Stylized Facts," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 155(2), pages 301-, June.
  5. Maury Gittleman & Michael Horrigan & Mary Joyce, 1998. "Flexible workplace practices: Evidence from a nationally representative survey," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(1), pages 99-115, October.
  6. Paul Osterman, 1994. "How Common is Workplace Transformation and Who Adopts it?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 47(2), pages 173-188, January.
  7. Jaime Ortega, 2001. "Job Rotation as a Learning Mechanism," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 47(10), pages 1361-1370, October.
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