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Job Rotation: Cost, Benefits, and Stylized Facts

Author

Listed:
  • Metin M. Cosgel
  • Thomas J. Miceli

Abstract

A fundamental principle of economics is that specialization and the division of labor increase the productivity of workers by allowing them to concentrate on narrowly defined tasks. However, not all firms appear to promote a high degree of specialization, but instead rotate workers among several tasks. This paper develops a simple model of work organization to identify the cost and benefits of job rotation and to determine the factors that affect a firm's choice between rotation and specialization. It then uses the model to explain some stylized facts regarding firms and organizations that employ or have historically employed rotation.

Suggested Citation

  • Metin M. Cosgel & Thomas J. Miceli, 1999. "Job Rotation: Cost, Benefits, and Stylized Facts," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 155(2), pages 301-301, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:mhr:jinste:urn:sici:0932-4569(199906)155:2_301:jrcbas_2.0.tx_2-n
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. DeVaro, Jed & Farnham, Martin, 2011. "Two perspectives on multiskilling and product-market volatility," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 862-871.
    2. repec:eee:eecrev:v:98:y:2017:i:c:p:424-441 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Tor Eriksson & Jaime Ortega, 2006. "The Adoption of Job Rotation: Testing the Theories," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(4), pages 653-666, July.
    4. Maija Halonen-Akatwijuka, 2010. "Organizational Design, Technology and the Boundaries of the Firm," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 77(307), pages 544-564, July.
    5. von Krogh, Georg & Spaeth, Sebastian & Lakhani, Karim R., 2003. "Community, joining, and specialization in open source software innovation: a case study," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1217-1241, July.
    6. Anil Arya & Brian Mittendorf, 2006. "Using Optional Job Rotation Programs to Gauge On-the-Job Learning," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 162(3), pages 505-515, September.
    7. Daniel Müller, 2010. "On Horns and Halos: Confirmation Bias and Job Rotation," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers bgse05_2010, University of Bonn, Germany.
    8. Eguchi, Kyota, 2005. "Job transfer and influence activities," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 187-197, February.
    9. Jellal, Mohamed, 2012. "An anti corruption mechansim," MPRA Paper 38647, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Katolnik, Svetlana & Hakenes, Hendrik, 2014. "On the Incentive Effect of Job Rotation," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100574, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D20 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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