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Do Supermarkets Change the Food Policy Agenda?

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  • Timmer, C. Peter

Abstract

Summary Policy makers want supermarkets to serve the interests of important groups in society, especially small farmers and the owners of traditional, small-scale food wholesale and retail facilities. But consumer issues are also important, including "internalizing" the full environmental costs of production and marketing, and helping supermarkets be part of the solution to the health problems generated by an "affluent" diet and lifestyle. This paper places the supermarket debate in the broader evolution of food policy analysis, a framework for integrating household, market, macro, and trade issues as they affect hunger and poverty. Increasingly, supermarkets provide the institutional linkages across these issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Timmer, C. Peter, 2009. "Do Supermarkets Change the Food Policy Agenda?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 1812-1819, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:11:p:1812-1819
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Schipmann, Christin & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "Modern food retailers and traditional markets in developing countries: Comparing quality, prices, and competition strategies in Thailand," Discussion Papers 108348, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:292-303 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Demmler, Kathrin M. & Ecker, Olivier & Qaim, Matin, 2018. "Supermarket Shopping and Nutritional Outcomes: A Panel Data Analysis for Urban Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 292-303.
    4. Qaim, Matin & Andersson, Camilla I.M. & Chege, Christine G.K. & Kimenju, Simon Chege & Klasen, Stephan & Rischke, Ramona, 2014. "Nutrition Effects of the Supermarket Revolution on Urban Consumers and Smallholder Farmers in Kenya," Discussion Papers 180976, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    5. Kimenju, Simon & Qaim, Matin, 2014. "The Nutrition Transition and Indicators of Child Malnutrition," Discussion Papers 195709, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    6. repec:mir:mirbus:v:7:y:2017:i:10:p:1-17 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Andam, Kwaw & Silver, Jed, 2016. "Food processing in Ghana: Trends, constraints, and opportunities:," GSSP policy notes 11, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Thapa, Ganesh & Gaiha, Raghav Gaiha, 1. "Food Security in Asia and the Pacific: The Role of Smallholders," Asian Journal of Agriculture and Development, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), vol. 9(1).
    9. Simon C. Kimenju & Matin Qaim, 2016. "The nutrition transition and indicators of child malnutrition," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(3), pages 571-583, June.
    10. Minten, Bart & Tamru, Seneshaw & Engida, Ermias & Kuma, Tadesse, 2013. "Ethiopia’s value chains on the move: The case of teff:," ESSP working papers 52, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Chege, Christine G.K. & Andersson, Camilla I.M. & Qaim, Matin, 2015. "Impacts of Supermarkets on Farm Household Nutrition in Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 394-407.
    12. Minten, Bart & Dereje, Mekdim & Engeda, Ermias & Kuma, Tadesse, 2015. "Coffee value chains on the move: Evidence from smallholder coffee farmers in Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 76, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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