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The Nutrition Transition and Indicators of Child Malnutrition

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  • Kimenju, Simon
  • Qaim, Matin

Abstract

We analyze how the nutrition transition affects child malnutrition in developing countries. It is often assumed that the nutrition transition affects child weight but not child growth, which could be one reason why child underweight decreases faster than child stunting. But these effects have hardly been analyzed empirically. Our cross-country panel regressions show that the nutrition transition reduces child underweight, while no consistent effect on child overweight is found. Against common views, our results also suggest that the nutrition transition reduces child stunting. Further research is required to confirm these findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Kimenju, Simon & Qaim, Matin, 2014. "The Nutrition Transition and Indicators of Child Malnutrition," GlobalFood Discussion Papers 195709, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:gagfdp:195709
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.195709
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/195709/files/GlobalFood_DP53.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Food Security and Poverty; International Development;

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