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Obesity Trends, Determinants and Policy Implications in Indonesia


  • Roemling, Cornelia
  • Qaim, Matin


Obesity is becoming a serious issue in many developing countries, with negative implications for economic growth and human wellbeing. While previous micro level studies on obesity have mostly used cross-section data, we analyze trends and determinants with panel data from Indonesia. Over the past 20 years, obesity has increased remarkably in Indonesia across all population groups, including rural and low income strata. The problem is particularly severe among women. Panel regressions confirm that changing food consumption patterns, coupled with decreasing physical activity, directly contribute to this trend. From a policy perspective, nutrition awareness and education campaigns, combined with programs to support leisure time exercise especially for women, seem to be most promising to contain the obesity pandemic.

Suggested Citation

  • Roemling, Cornelia & Qaim, Matin, 2012. "Obesity Trends, Determinants and Policy Implications in Indonesia," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126208, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126208

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kimenju, Simon & Qaim, Matin, 2014. "The Nutrition Transition and Indicators of Child Malnutrition," Discussion Papers 195709, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    2. Butzlaf, Iris & Minos, Dimitrios, 2016. "Understanding the Drivers of Overweight and Obesity in Developing Countries: The Case of South Africa," Discussion Papers 232025, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    3. Goryakin, Yevgeniy & Suhrcke, Marc, 2014. "Economic development, urbanization, technological change and overweight: What do we learn from 244 Demographic and Health Surveys?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 109-127.
    4. Sumarto, Sudarno & de Silva, Indunil, 2015. "Child Malnutrition in Indonesia: Can Education, Sanitation and Healthcare Augment the Role of Income?," MPRA Paper 66631, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 09 Sep 2015.
    5. Wendy J. Umberger & Xiaobo He & Nicholas Minot & Hery Toiba, 2015. "Examining the Relationship between the Use of Supermarkets and Over-nutrition in Indonesia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(2), pages 510-525.
    6. Simon C. Kimenju & Matin Qaim, 2016. "The nutrition transition and indicators of child malnutrition," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(3), pages 571-583, June.
    7. Roemling, Cornelia & Qaim, Matin, 2013. "Dual burden households and intra-household nutritional inequality in Indonesia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 563-573.


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