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Child Labor in Carpet Weaving: Impact of Social Labeling in India and Nepal

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  • Chakrabarty, Sayan
  • Grote, Ulrike

Abstract

Summary Does the labeling of tradable products like carpets which have been produced without child labor increase the welfare of children and their families? This paper presents results of surveys conducted in India and Nepal. The findings suggest a positive link between social labeling and the removal of child laborers for households above the subsistence level. However, for households below the subsistence level, no significant influence has been found.

Suggested Citation

  • Chakrabarty, Sayan & Grote, Ulrike, 2009. "Child Labor in Carpet Weaving: Impact of Social Labeling in India and Nepal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1683-1693, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:10:p:1683-1693
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Egels-Zandén, 2014. "Revisiting Supplier Compliance with MNC Codes of Conduct: Recoupling Policy and Practice at Chinese Toy Suppliers," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 119(1), pages 59-75, January.
    2. Margaryta Klymak, 2017. "The Trade Impacts of the Naming and Shaming of Forced and Child Labor," Trinity Economics Papers tep1517, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    3. Doytch, Nadia & Thelen, Nina & Mendoza, Ronald U., 2014. "The impact of FDI on child labor: Insights from an empirical analysis of sectoral FDI data and case studies," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(P2), pages 157-167.
    4. Moana S. Simas & Laura Golsteijn & Mark A. J. Huijbregts & Richard Wood & Edgar G. Hertwich, 2014. "The “Bad Labor” Footprint: Quantifying the Social Impacts of Globalization," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(11), pages 1-27, October.
    5. Michele Di Maio & Giorgio Fabbri, 2013. "Consumer boycott, household heterogeneity, and child labor," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 1609-1630, October.
    6. Auriol, Emmanuelle & Schilizzi, Steven G.M., 2015. "Quality signaling through certification in developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 105-121.
    7. Resmi Bhaskaran & Dev Nathan & Nicola Phillips & C. Upendranadh, 2013. "Vulnerable workers and labour standards (non-)compliance in global production networks: home-based child labour in Delhi’s garment sector," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series ctg-2013-16, BWPI, The University of Manchester.

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