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Does the income elasticity of road traffic depend on the source of income?

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  • Le Vine, Scott
  • Chen, Bingqing (Emily)
  • Polak, John

Abstract

An extensive body of literature addresses the income elasticity of road traffic, in which income is typically treated as a homogenous quantity. Here we report evidence of heterogeneity in cross-sectional estimates of the elasticity of vehicle-kilometres of travel (VKT) with respect to income, when household income is disaggregated on the basis of income source.

Suggested Citation

  • Le Vine, Scott & Chen, Bingqing (Emily) & Polak, John, 2014. "Does the income elasticity of road traffic depend on the source of income?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 15-29.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:67:y:2014:i:c:p:15-29
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2014.06.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chu, Singfat, 2015. "Car restraint policies and mileage in Singapore," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 404-412.

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