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Improving the analysis of road pricing acceptability surveys by using hybrid models

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  • Di Ciommo, Floridea
  • Monzón, Andrés
  • Fernandez-Heredia, Alvaro

Abstract

Several international studies have analyzed the acceptability of road pricing schemes by means of an attitude survey in combination with the results of a stated choice experiment using both a descriptive analysis and a discrete-choice model with binary choice (“accept” or “not accept” the toll). However, the use of hybrid discrete choice models constitutes an innovative alternative for integrating subjective attitudes and perceptions deriving from the survey of attitudes with the more objective variables from the stated choice experiment. This paper analyzes the results of applying these models to measure the acceptability of interurban road pricing among different groups of stakeholders (road freight and passenger operators, highway concessionaires, and associations of private car users) with qualitatively significant opinions on road pricing measures. Our results show that hybrid models are better suited to explaining the acceptability of a road pricing scheme by different groups of stakeholders than a separate analysis of the survey of attitudes and a discrete-choice model applied on a stated choice experiment. A particular finding was that the strong psycho-social latent variable of the perception of fairness explains the rejection or acceptance of a toll scheme by road stakeholders.

Suggested Citation

  • Di Ciommo, Floridea & Monzón, Andrés & Fernandez-Heredia, Alvaro, 2013. "Improving the analysis of road pricing acceptability surveys by using hybrid models," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 302-316.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:49:y:2013:i:c:p:302-316 DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2013.01.007
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    Cited by:

    1. Francisco J. Bahamonde-Birke & Juan de Dios Ortúzar, 2015. "About the Categorization of Latent Variables in Hybrid Choice Models," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1527, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Di Ciommo, Floridea & Comendador, Julio & López-Lambas, María Eugenia & Cherchi, Elisabetta & Ortúzar, Juan de Dios, 2014. "Exploring the role of social capital influence variables on travel behaviour," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 46-55.
    3. Álvaro Fernández-Heredia & Sergio Jara-Díaz & Andrés Monzón, 2016. "Modelling bicycle use intention: the role of perceptions," Transportation, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 1-23, January.
    4. Álvaro Fernández-Heredia & Sergio Jara-Díaz & Andrés Monzón, 2016. "Modelling bicycle use intention: the role of perceptions," Transportation, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 1-23, January.
    5. Chorus, Caspar G. & Kroesen, Maarten, 2014. "On the (im-)possibility of deriving transport policy implications from hybrid choice models," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 217-222.
    6. Kaplan, Sigal & de Abreu e Silva, João & Di Ciommo, Floridea, 2014. "The relationship between young people׳s transit use and their perceptions of equity concepts in transit service provision," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 79-87.
    7. Juan Gomez & Anestis Papanikolaou & José Manuel Vassallo, 2017. "Users’ perceptions and willingness to pay in interurban toll roads: identifying differences across regions from a nationwide survey in Spain," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 449-474, May.
    8. repec:eee:trapol:v:60:y:2017:i:c:p:119-130 is not listed on IDEAS

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