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Lettuce be happy: A longitudinal UK study on the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and well-being

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  • Ocean, Neel
  • Howley, Peter
  • Ensor, Jonathan

Abstract

While the role of diet in influencing physical health is now well-established, some recent research suggests that increased consumption of fruits and vegetables could play a role in enhancing mental well-being. A limitation with much of this existing research is its reliance on cross-sectional correlations, convenience samples, and/or lack of adequate controls.

Suggested Citation

  • Ocean, Neel & Howley, Peter & Ensor, Jonathan, 2019. "Lettuce be happy: A longitudinal UK study on the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and well-being," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 222(C), pages 335-345.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:222:y:2019:i:c:p:335-345
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.12.017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Anderson, Austen R. & Fowers, Blaine J., 2020. "Lifestyle behaviors, psychological distress, and well-being: A daily diary study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 263(C).

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