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Are patents signals for the IPO market? An EU–US comparison for the software industry

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  • Useche, Diego

Abstract

This study investigates empirically whether patents can be signals to financial markets, thus reducing problems of asymmetric information. In particular we study how patenting behaviour impacts on the way investors perceive software firms’ growth potential through an increase in the amount invested at the initial public offering (IPO) of firms in the US and Europe. This study performs regressions on the relationship of patent applications before IPO and the amount of money collected at the IPO, while controlling other factors that may influence IPO performance. We also attempt to account for a potential source of endogeneity problems that can arise for self-selection bias and simultaneity between the number of patent applications prior to going public and the amount of money collected at IPO. We find significant and robust positive correlations between patent applications and IPO performance. The signalling power of patenting is significantly different for US and European companies, and is related to the difficulty in obtaining a signal and its scarcity. An additional patent application prior to IPO increases IPO proceeds by about 0.507% and 1.13% for US and European companies, respectively. Results suggest that a less ‘applicant friendly’ patenting system increases the credibility of patents as signals and their value for IPO investors.

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  • Useche, Diego, 2014. "Are patents signals for the IPO market? An EU–US comparison for the software industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(8), pages 1299-1311.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:43:y:2014:i:8:p:1299-1311
    DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2014.04.004
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    1. repec:eee:respol:v:46:y:2017:i:6:p:1133-1141 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Philippe Gorry & Diego Useche, 2018. "Orphan Drug Designations as Valuable Intangible Assets for IPO Investors in Pharma-Biotech Companies," NBER Chapters,in: Economic Dimensions of Personalized and Precision Medicine National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Morricone, Serena & Munari, Federico & Oriani, Raffaele & de Rassenfosse, Gaetan, 2017. "Commercialization Strategy and IPO Underpricing," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(6), pages 1133-1141.
    4. Jean Belin & Marianne Guille & Nathalie Lazaric & Mérindol Valérie, 2018. "Defense firms adapting to major changes in the French R&D funding system," Post-Print halshs-01798712, HAL.
    5. Sunny Hahn & Jina Kang, 2017. "Complementary or conflictory?: the effects of the composition of the syndicate on venture capital-backed IPOs in the US stock market," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 44(1), pages 77-102, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Software firms; Patents; Signals; Initial public offering (IPO); Venture capital; Start-ups;

    JEL classification:

    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services

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