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Linking the value of energy reliability to the acceptance of energy infrastructure: Evidence from the EU

Author

Listed:
  • Cohen, Jed J.
  • Moeltner, Klaus
  • Reichl, Johannes
  • Schmidthaler, Michael

Abstract

Existing studies on the acceptability of energy-related infrastructure have centered around how to overcome the Not-In-My-Backyard phenomenon amongst local stakeholders, focusing primarily on drivers such as community participation and direct economic benefits to impacted areas. To date, none of these contributions have related the acceptability question to the value of power reliability to the same stakeholders. We fill this gap by combining an analysis of outage vulnerability with an examination of infrastructure acceptability using a unique data set from 15 EU countries with household-level information on both aspects of power provision. We find only limited evidence of a positive relationship between local residents’ sensitivity to outages and their acceptability of new energy infrastructure projects. This stresses the importance of creating awareness amongst stakeholders on how planned infrastructure expansions relate to energy security for their own household.

Suggested Citation

  • Cohen, Jed J. & Moeltner, Klaus & Reichl, Johannes & Schmidthaler, Michael, 2016. "Linking the value of energy reliability to the acceptance of energy infrastructure: Evidence from the EU," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 124-143.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:resene:v:45:y:2016:i:c:p:124-143
    DOI: 10.1016/j.reseneeco.2016.06.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Naghmeh Niroomand & Glenn P. Jenkins, 2018. "Estimation of Households’ and Businesses’ Willingness to Pay for Improved Reliability of Electricity Supply in Nepal," Development Discussion Papers 2018-05, JDI Executive Programs.
    2. repec:eee:enepol:v:132:y:2019:i:c:p:1064-1075 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:enepol:v:132:y:2019:i:c:p:1176-1183 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:8:p:2364-:d:224566 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:appene:v:212:y:2018:i:c:p:141-150 is not listed on IDEAS

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