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Culture and human capital in a two-sector endogenous growth model

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  • Bucci, Alberto
  • Segre, Giovanna

Abstract

Recent literature in the field of cultural economics highlights a possible inversion in the usual causality relation (from economic growth to culture) and points out that culture may represent an important driver of economic growth. By viewing culture in line with Throsby's (2001) definition of cultural capital (i.e., an asset of tangible and intangible cultural expressions), in this article we analyze one possible channel through which culture may positively affect economic growth, namely the existence of a relationship of complementarity between cultural and human capital investments. Using a two-sector endogenous growth model, we find that in the long run a higher growth rate of real per-capita income can be attained the more cultural and human capital investments are complementary for each other in the process leading to agents' skill acquisition. We also analyze the conditions under which an increase of the cultural capital share in total GDP can be conducive to a rise of real per-capita income.

Suggested Citation

  • Bucci, Alberto & Segre, Giovanna, 2011. "Culture and human capital in a two-sector endogenous growth model," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(4), pages 279-293, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:reecon:v:65:y:2011:i:4:p:279-293
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    Cited by:

    1. Simone Marsiglio & Alberto Ansuategi & Maria Carmen Gallastegui, 2016. "The Environmental Kuznets Curve and the Structural Change Hypothesis," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 63(2), pages 265-288, February.
    2. Wu, Jay, 2013. "Accumulated choices, cultural triangle and economic growth," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 158-169.
    3. Alberto BUCCI & Simone MARSIGLIO, 2016. "Financial Development and Economic Growth: Long Run Equilibrium and Transitional Dynamics," Departmental Working Papers 2016-16, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    4. Petrakis, Panagiotis & Kostis, Pantelis, 2013. "Economic growth and cultural change," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 147-157.
    5. Yasir Khan & Attiya Yasmin Javid, 2015. "The Impact of Formal and Informal Institutions on Economic Performance: A Cross-Country Analysis," PIDE-Working Papers 2015:130, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    6. Rick Mourits & Luuk Van Kempen, 2016. "How Do the Middle Class and the Poor Grow Apart? An Empirical Test of the Psychological Well-Being Pathway in Middle-Income Countries," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 28(5), pages 893-915, November.

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