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Availability Of Higher Education And Long‐Term Economic Growth

Author

Listed:
  • RYO HORII
  • AKIOMI KITAGAWA
  • KOICHI FUTAGAMI

Abstract

In the present paper, we examine the economic growth effects of a limited availability of higher education in a simple endogenous growth model with overlapping generations. It is shown that this limited availability might promote economic growth by increasing aggregate savings. If the supply of human capital is restricted, its price remains high and a large share of aggregate output is distributed to young households, which need to save for their old age. When this growth‐enhancing effect is strong enough, an excessive increase in availability leads to a shortage of investable funds, which substantially reduces economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Ryo Horii & Akiomi Kitagawa & Koichi Futagami, 2008. "Availability Of Higher Education And Long‐Term Economic Growth," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 156-177, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:59:y:2008:i:2:p:156-177
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-5876.2007.00403.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Aziz, Babar & Khan, Tasneem & Aziz, Shumaila, 2008. "Impact of Higher Education on Economic Growth of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 22912, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2008.
    2. Ryo Horii & Koichi Futagami & Akiomi Kitagawa, 2004. "Investment efficiency and intergenerational income distribution: a paradoxical result," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 15(2), pages 1-6.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:8:p:2615-:d:159992 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ganegodage, K. Renuka & Rambaldi, Alicia N., 2011. "The impact of education investment on Sri Lankan economic growth," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1491-1502.
    5. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:15:y:2004:i:2:p:1-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Akiomi Kitagawa & Ryo Horii & Koichi Futagami, 2004. "Who Benefits from a Better Education Environment?," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 04-15, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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