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Effectiveness and addictiveness of quantitative easing

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  • Karadi, Peter
  • Nakov, Anton

Abstract

This paper analyzes optimal asset-purchase policies in a macroeconomic model with banks, which face occasionally-binding balance-sheet constraints. It proves analytically that asset-purchase policies are effective in offsetting large financial disturbances, which impair banks’ capital position. It warns, however, that the policy can remain ineffective after non-financial shocks and might offer no substitute for interest rate policy when the latter is constrained by the lower bound. Furthermore, the asset-purchase policy is addictive because it flattens the yield curve, reduces the profitability of the banking sector, and therefore slows down its recapitalization. Consequently, the optimal exit from large central bank balance sheets is gradual.

Suggested Citation

  • Karadi, Peter & Nakov, Anton, 2021. "Effectiveness and addictiveness of quantitative easing," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 1096-1117.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:117:y:2021:i:c:p:1096-1117
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2020.09.002
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    Cited by:

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    2. Laeven, Luc & Maddaloni, Angela & Mendicino, Caterina, 2022. "Monetary and macroprudential policies: trade-offs and interactions," Research Bulletin, European Central Bank, vol. 92.
    3. John Kandrac, 2021. "Can the Federal Reserve Effectively Target Main Street? Evidence from the 1970s Recession," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2021-061, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Andrejs Zlobins, 2022. "Into the Universe of Unconventional Monetary Policy: State-dependence, Interaction and Complementarities," Working Papers 2022/05, Latvijas Banka.
    5. Erceg, Christopher J. & Jakab, Zoltan & Lindé, Jesper, 2021. "Monetary policy strategies for the European Central Bank," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 132(C).
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    7. Andrejs Zlobins, 2021. "On the Time-varying Effects of the ECB's Asset Purchases," Working Papers 2021/02, Latvijas Banka.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Large-scale asset purchases; Balance-Sheet-Constrained banks;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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