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The mining industry in Queensland, Australia: Some regional development issues

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  • Ivanova, Galina

Abstract

Mining boom has created various impacts in the regions of Queensland, Australia. However, it is not clear how to increase positive impacts from mining within the regions. Mining industry may be the dominant industry in the local community and in the region in terms of providing local employment and generating income; it does not necessarily have direct linkages to the local economy and therefore does not contribute fully to diversified sustainable development of the local community or the region. This paper discusses the dependency of mining communities on the resource industry. The regional economic diversity is identified using the input–output analysis. This paper attempts to identify the key sectors, backward and forward linkages within three regions in Queensland: Fitzroy, South West and Darling Downs Statistical Divisions in order to analyse which industries in each region are needed to be encouraged to increase their connections with the mining industry to induce higher retention of benefits from mining boom and reduce regions dependence on mining.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivanova, Galina, 2014. "The mining industry in Queensland, Australia: Some regional development issues," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 101-114.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jrpoli:v:39:y:2014:i:c:p:101-114
    DOI: 10.1016/j.resourpol.2014.01.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. David A. Fleming & Thomas G. Measham & Dusan Paredes, 2015. "Understanding the resource curse (or blessing) across national and regional scales: Theory, empirical challenges and an application," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 59(4), pages 624-639, October.
    2. Frederiksen, Anders & Kadenic, Maja Due, 2016. "Mining in Arctic and Non-Arctic Regions: A Socioeconomic Assessment," IZA Discussion Papers 9883, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. repec:bla:revurb:v:29:y:2017:i:1:p:46-62 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:elg:eechap:14395_26 is not listed on IDEAS

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