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The Resource Curse Hypothesis: Evidence from Ecuador

Author

Listed:
  • Andrea Cori

    (Department of Economics, University of Roma 3, Italy.)

  • Salvatore Monni

    () (Department of Economics, University of Roma 3, Italy.)

Abstract

The aim of this work is to evaluate the economic stability of the choices made by the Government of Ecuador regarding the management of natural resources in the context of the Revolucion Ciudadana designed to create a society based on Buen Vivir. The choice of an intensification of the mining sector not only shows a change in the government’s perspective (from Sumak Kawsayto sustainable development), but also requires an analysis that highlights the possible risks outlined in the recent theory defined as the Resource Curse Hypothesis. Indeed, in this work, the structural conditions, which the reference theoretical framework suggests are essential to avoiding the Resource Curse Hypothesis, will be analysed in order to assess the economic effectiveness of the change of perspective implemented in the Revolucion Ciudadana.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrea Cori & Salvatore Monni, 2014. "The Resource Curse Hypothesis: Evidence from Ecuador," SEEDS Working Papers 2814, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised Oct 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:srt:wpaper:2814
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    File Function: Revised version, 2014
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    2. Shannon Pendergast & Judith Clarke & G. Cornelis van Kooten, 2008. "Corruption, Development and the Curse of Natural Resources," Working Papers 2008-10, University of Victoria, Department of Economics, Resource Economics and Policy Analysis Research Group.
    3. Frederick van der Ploeg, 2011. "Natural Resources: Curse or Blessing?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(2), pages 366-420, June.
    4. World Bank, 2011. "The Changing Wealth of Nations : Measuring Sustainable Development in the New Millennium," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2252, August.
    5. Claudio Bravo-Ortega & Jose De Gregorio, "undated". "The Relative Richness of the Poor? Natural Resources, Human Capital and Economic Growth," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 139, Central Bank of Chile.
    6. Andersen, Jørgen Juel & Aslaksen, Silje, 2008. "Constitutions and the resource curse," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 227-246, October.
    7. Solow, Robert M, 1986. " On the Intergenerational Allocation of Natural Resources," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(1), pages 141-149.
    8. Atkinson, Giles & Hamilton, Kirk, 2003. "Savings, Growth and the Resource Curse Hypothesis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(11), pages 1793-1807, November.
    9. Buiter, William H & Purvis, Douglas D, 1980. "Oil, Disinflation, and Export Competitiveness : A Model of the "Dutch Disease"," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 185, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
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    12. Tobias Kronenberg, 2004. "The curse of natural resources in the transition economies," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 12(3), pages 399-426, September.
    13. Corden, W Max & Neary, J Peter, 1982. "Booming Sector and De-Industrialisation in a Small Open Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(368), pages 825-848, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ecolec:v:138:y:2017:i:c:p:1-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Salvatore Monni & Luca Serafini, 2017. "The relationship between Ecuador and China: a dangerous alliance?," SEEDS Working Papers 0917, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised Dec 2017.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Buen Vivir; Ecuador; Human Capital; Natural resources; Sustainability; Resource Curse Hypothesis; Sumak Kawsay;

    JEL classification:

    • O21 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Planning Models; Planning Policy
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • P48 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Political Economy; Legal Institutions; Property Rights; Natural Resources; Energy; Environment; Regional Studies
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • Q30 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - General
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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